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Curricula and Syllabi of FNSPE CTU in Prague

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Aktualizace dat: 28.8.2019

česky

Bachelor degree programmeNuclear Engineering
Year 1
course code teacher ws ss ws cr. ss cr.

Compulsory courses

Calculus 101MAN Pošta 4+4 z - - 4 -
Course:Calculus 101MANdoc. Ing. Pošta Severin Ph.D.----
Abstract:Basic calculus (real analysis, functions of one real variable, differential calculus).
Outline:1. Basics of mathematical logic, equations and inequalities, goniometric functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, sums and products, induction.
2. Sets and mappings.
3. Real and complex sequence - limit, basic properties, limits of special sequences, number "e" and exponential function, some elementary functions.
4. Limit and continuity of functions of one real variable - basic properties.
5. Derivative of functions - basic properties.
6. Basic theorems of differential calculus. 7. Constructing graphs of functions.
Outline (exercises):1. Basic properties of functions and mappings.
2. Supremum, Infimum.
3. Limits of sequences.
4. Acculumation points.
5. Limits of real functions.
6. Continuity.
7. Derivative, graphs of real functions.
Goals:The goal of this course is to manage basic techniques of computing limits of sequences, limits of real functions of one real variable and of differential calculus.
Requirements:No prerequisities.
Key words:differential calculus, real function, real variable, continuity, limit, derivative
ReferencesRecommended references:
[1] Apostol: Mathematical Analysis, Addison Wesley, 1974.
[2] W. Rudin: Principles of Mathematical Analysis. McGraw-Hill, Mexico, 1980.

Calculus B 1, Examination01MANB Pošta - zk - - 4 -
Course:Calculus B 1, Examination01MANBdoc. Ing. Pošta Severin Ph.D.----
Abstract:Examination of knowledge about stuff lectured in the 01MAN course.
Outline:Examination of knowledge about stuff lectured in the 01MAN course.
Outline (exercises):-
Goals:The goal of the course is to verify the knowledge about stuff lectured in the 01MAN course.
Requirements:No prerequisities.
Key words:The keywords are given under the 01MAN course.
ReferencesThe source materials are given under the 01MAN course.

Linear Algebra 101LAL Dvořáková 3+2 z - - 2 -
Course:Linear Algebra 101LALdoc. Ing. Dvořáková Lubomíra Ph.D.----
Abstract:
Outline:
Outline (exercises):
Goals:
Requirements:
Key words:
References

Linear Algebra B 1, Examination01LALB Dvořáková - zk - - 3 -
Course:Linear Algebra B 1, Examination01LALBIng. Ambrož Petr Ph.D. / doc. Ing. Dvořáková Lubomíra Ph.D.----
Abstract:
Outline:
Outline (exercises):
Goals:
Requirements:
Key words:
References

Calculus B201MAB2 Pošta - - 2+4 z,zk - 7
Course:Calculus B201MAB2doc. Ing. Pošta Severin Ph.D.-2+4 Z,ZK-7
Abstract:Basic calculus (real analysis, indefinite and definite integrals and series).
Outline:1. Antiderivative - basic properties, integration by parts, by substitution, antiderivative of rational and other elementary functions.
2. Newton and Riemann integrals, their relation, convergence of integral.
3. Some applications of integral - area of plane regions, length of a curve, volume and surface areas.
4. Infinite series - sum, basic properties, convergence of series with nonnegative terms, with arbitrary terms.

Outline (exercises):1. Antiderivatives. Integration by parts, by substitution.
2. Calculus of Riemann integrals.
3. Applications of integrals.
4. Infinite series and their convergence.
Goals:The goal of this course is to manage basic techniques of computing indefinite and definite integrals and examining convergence of sequences.
Requirements:Calculus 1 (01MANA or 01MANB).
Key words:integral calculus, real function, real variable, analysis, limit, antiderivative, Riemann integral, infinite series
ReferencesRecommended references:
[1] T. Apostol: Mathematical Analysis, Addison Wesley, 1974.
[2] W. Rudin: Principles of Mathematical Analysis. McGraw-Hill, Mexico, 1980.


Linear Algebra B201LAB2 Ambrož - - 1+2 z,zk - 4
Course:Linear Algebra B201LAB2Ing. Ambrož Petr Ph.D.-1+2 Z,ZK-4
Abstract:The subject summarizes the most important notions and theorems related to the matrix theory, to the study of vector spaces with a scalar product and to the linear geometry.
Outline:Matrices and systems of linear algebraic equations - determinants - scalar product and orthogonality - eigenvalues and eigenvectors of matrices - linear geometry in Euclidean space
Outline (exercises):1. Solving systems of linear algebraic equations
2. Calculation of inverse matrices using the Gauss elimination
3. Permutations and determinants
4. Searching for orthogonal and orthonormal bases, application of the Gram-Schmidt orthogonalization method, calculation of orthogonal projections of vectors
4. Computation of eigenvalues and eigenvectors of matrices
5. Distinct descriptions of linear manifolds and convex sets, computation of intersections of linear manifolds
Goals:Knowledge:
Basic notions from the matrix theory, notions related to the scalar product and the linear geometry from the theoretical point of view.

Abilities:
Application of the knowledge in practical problems.
Requirements:01LALA or 01LALB
Key words:Matrices, systems of linear algebraic equations, determinants, scalar product and orthogonality, eigenvalues and eigenvectors of matrices, linear geometry in the Euclidean space
ReferencesKey references:
[1] H. G. Campbell, Linear Algebra with Applications, Prentice-Hall, Inc., Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey, 2nd edition, 1980
[2] C.W.Curtis, Linear Algebra, An Introductory Approach, Springer-Verlag, New York, Berlin, Heidelberg, Tokyo, 1974, 4th edition, 1984

Recommended references:
[3] P. Lancaster, Theory of Matrices, Academic Press, New York, London, 1969

Mechanics02MECH Břeň, Chadzitaskos 4+2 z - - 4 -
Course:Mechanics02MECHRNDr. Břeň David Ph.D.4+2 Z-4-
Abstract:Introduction to physics, physical quantities and units. Particle kinematics, basic types of motion and their superposition. Particle dynamics, one-dimensional equations of motion, motion in central force field, forces in noninertial reference frames. Mechanics of system of free particles, two-body problem, collisions. Mechanics of rigid body, rotation. Fundamentals of continuum mechanics, elasticity, hydrodynamics. Sound.
Outline:1.Kinematics. Acceleration. Superposition of motions.
2.Newton´s laws, force, impuls, work, power, energy.
3.One-dimensional motion, harmonic oscillator.
4.Resonance. Mathematical pendulum.
5.The field of central force. Kepler´s problem.
6.Noninertial frames of reference, inertial forces.
7.Conservation of momenta and energy.
8.Two-body problem, collisions and scattering.
9.Rigid body, moment of inertia.
10.Gyroscopes, Euler´s equations.
11.Fundamentals of continuum mechanics.
12.Elasticity, Hooke´s law.
13.Equilibrium and motion of fluids, sound propagation.
Outline (exercises):Calculations of examples on:
1.Kinematics. Acceleration. Superposition of motions.
2.Newton´s laws, force, impuls, work, power, energy.
3.One-dimensional motion, harmonic oscillator.
4.Resonance. Mathematical pendulum.
5.The field of central force. Kepler´s problem.
6.Noninertial frames of reference, inertial forces.
7.Conservation of momenta and energy.
8.Two-body problem, collisions and scattering.
9.Rigid body, moment of inertia.
10.Gyroscopes, Euler´s equations.
11.Fundamentals of continuum mechanics.
12.Elasticity, Hooke´s law.
13.Equilibrium and motion of fluids, sound propagation.
Goals:Knowledge: to learn the basic of machanics, to solve simple equation of motion.

Skills: solving if simple equation of motion
Requirements:Secondary school knowledges.
Key words:mechanics
ReferencesKey references:
[1] Ch. Kittel, Mechanics. McGraw 1965

Recommended references:
[2] Halliday, Resnick, Walker: Fundamentals of physics. J. Wiley 2001

Mechanics - Examination02MECHZ Břeň, Chadzitaskos - zk - - 2 -
Course:Mechanics - Examination02MECHZRNDr. Břeň David Ph.D.- ZK-2-
Abstract:The content of the subject is the examination according to the plan of studies.
Outline:The content of the subject is the examination according to the plan of studies.
Outline (exercises):
Goals:Verification of knowledge and abilities in the given field by examination.
Requirements:
Key words:
ReferencesLiterature is given by corresponding lectureaccording to the study plan.

Electricity and Magnetism02ELMA Chadzitaskos - - 4+2 z,zk - 6
Course:Electricity and Magnetism02ELMAprof. Ing. Chadzitaskos Goce CSc.-4+2 Z,ZK-6
Abstract:Electric charge, Coulomb's law, electrostatic field, Gauss' law. Electric dipole, polarization. Conductors and dielectrics. Electric current and circuits, conductivity. Basics of the relativity theory. Electrodynamic forces, magnetic field. Magnetic dipole, magnetics. Electromagnetic induction, ac currents. Electromagnetic waves, Maxwell equations
Outline:1.Electrostatics, Coulomb law, energy
2.Gauss law, potential, partial derivative
3.Gradient, divergency, rotation
4.Multipole?s expansion, dipole, polarization
5.Conductors and dielectrics
6.Stacionry electric field, conductivity
7. Basic of the relativity theory. Einstein?s princip, Lorentz transformation
8.Relativistic mass and momentum, equation of motion
9.Fields of moving charges.
10.Biot Savart´s law, vector potential
11.Magnetic dipole, magnetization.
12.Hall?s effect, electromagnetic induction
13.AC currents, RLC citcuits
14.Maxwell equations, electromagnetic waves
Outline (exercises):1.Electrostatics, Coulomb law, energy
2.Gauss law, potential, partial derivative
3.Gradient, divergency, rotation
4.Multipole?s expansion, dipole, polarization
5.Conductors and dielectrics
6.Stacionry electric field, conductivity
7. Basic of the relativity theory. Einstein?s princip, Lorentz transformation
8.Relativistic mass and momentum, equation of motion
9.Fields of moving charges.
10.Biot Savart´s law, vector potential
11.Magnetic dipole, magnetization.
12.Hall?s effect, electromagnetic induction
13.AC currents, RLC citcuits
14.Maxwell equations, electromagnetic waves
Goals:Knowledge:
fundamentals of elektricity and magnetism

Skills:
solving problems elektricity and magnetism
Requirements:
Key words:Physics,Electricity, Magnetism, Special theory of relativity
ReferencesKey references:
[1] I. Štoll: Electricity and Magnetism, ČVUT Praha 2003 (in Czech)
[2] B. Sedlák, I. Štoll: Elektřina a megnetimus, Academia Praha 2002 (in Czech)
[3] D. C. Pandey: ELECTRICITY & MAGNETISM, Arihant Publications; Fourteenth edition 2016,
ISBN-13: 78-9351761013

Recommended references:
[4] Paul A. Tipler: Physics I, II. Worth Publisher, 1976.


Basics of Programming18ZPRO Jarý, Virius 4 z - - 4 -
Course:Basics of Programming18ZPROdoc. Ing. Virius Miroslav CSc.2+2 Z-4-
Abstract:This lecture is intended mainly for students, with little or no experience in programming. It familiarizes the students with the basic concepts in programming and with the C++programming language.
Outline:1.The computer, the program, the algorithm
2. Data mapping in computer memory, data type
3. Program structure
4. variables and non-object data types
5. Statements
6. Functions
7. Pointers, linked lists
8. Modular structure of the program, object types
Outline (exercises):1. The first program
2. Algorithm
3. Using built-in data types
4. More complex programs
5. Non-object data types
6. Statements
7. Input/output
8. Functions
9.Pointers: Non-object implementation of the single linked list
10.Object types in C++
Goals:Knowledge:
The C++ programming language

Ability:
Solving basic programming tasks using the C++ programming language
Requirements:Common computer user's knowledge only; no other prerequisities.
Key words:C++;data type;statement;declation;array;record;set;compilation;debugging;object;
ReferencesKey references:
[1] Virius, M. Basic C++ Porgramming. Praha: ČVUT 2014. ISBN 978-80-01-05470-3. (in Czech)

Recommended references:
[2] Stroustrup, B.: The C++ programming language. 4th ed. Addison-Wesley 2013. ISBN 978-0-321-56384-2.

General Chemistry 115CH12 Motl 2+1 z 2+1 z,zk 3 3
Course:General Chemistry 115CH1Ing. Motl Alois CSc.2+1 Z-3-
Abstract:The most important concepts, quantities and units used in chemistry are introduced in the course General Chemistry I. Their significance and practical use are illustrated by examples solved in exercises.
Outline:1.Chemistry and its disciplines in natural sciences system, the change of the state of a system (process) as the result of energy/mass transfer, the change of the quality of substance resulting from chemical process (chemical reaction), the classification of substances, elements, compounds.
2.Elementary structural units of substances, atoms, molecules, proportional mass (weight) of atoms and molecules, molar amount of matter and its unit mole, associated molar quantities and their use in stoichiometric calculations.
3.Chemical nomenclature, empirical (stoichiometric), molecular, structural and structural-electronic (Lewis) formulas.
4.Electronegativity and its connection with chemical properties of elements, oxidation state (oxidation number) and the formal charge of an atom, their significance.
5.The composition of material systems, concentrations and units, calculations with concentration data.
6.Chemical reactions classification, chemical equations, balancing chemical equations, the work with chemical equations, stoichiometric calculations using chemical equations.
7.The structure of atoms I: Quantum and wave - mechanical model of atom, the types of atomic orbitals and their characterisation.
8.The structure of atoms II: The arrangement of electron shell (aufbau principle), valence shell, valence electrons, periodical system of elements.
9.The structure of molecules I: The substance of chemical bond, classification of chemical bonds, the order of bond (multiplied bonds), bond energy and bond length.
10.The structure of molecules II: The wave - mechanical concept of chemical binding, molecular orbitals as the combination of valence atomic orbitals, binding, antibinding and non-effective molecular orbitals, application on diatomic molecules.
11.Ideal gas, ideal-gas equation of state, the mixtures of ideal gases, partial pressures and partial volumes of individual components, Ostwald's law, applications on gaseous systems calculations.
12.Real gases, Van der Waals equation of state, the critical state of matter, the connection between gaseous and liquid state of matter.
13.The liquid state of matter, its connection with the solid state of matter.
14.Chemical bonds in liquids and solids.
Outline (exercises):1.Chemical calculations involving basic quantities (molar mass, molar amount of matter, molar volume).
2.Electronegativity, oxidation number determination.
3.Chemical nomenclature, types of chemical formulas, their development.
4.Concentration quantities, concentration calculations.
5.Chemical equations balancing, the use in stoichiometric calculations, chemical equations combining.
6.Electron configuration of free atoms of elements, periodic system of elements, group trends of chemical properties of elements.
7.Chemical bonds sigma, pi, delta, the development of structural electronic formulas of diatomic molecule using molecular orbital (MO) theory, application of MO theory onto polyatomic molecules.
8.Gas phase, application of the state equation of ideal gas, mixtures of gases, partial pressure, partial volume, using in calculations.
Goals:The course General Chemistry I provides sufficient information in basic chemical concepts, quantities and units for the students of non-chemical specializations.
Requirements:Chemistry knowledge at secondary school level.
Key words:General chemistry, atoms, molecules, chemical formulas, chemical reactions, electronegativity, concentration, stoichiometric calculations, the structure of atoms, atomic orbital, the structure of molecules, chemical bond, molecular orbitals, the states of matter.
ReferencesKey references:
1.Chang, R.: Chemistry, ninth edition, McGraw-Hill, New York, 2007
2.Zumdahl, S.: Chemical Principles, D. C. Heath and Company, Canada, USA,1992
Recommended references
:
1.Dickerson, R., Gray, H., Haight, G.: Chemical Principles, 3.vydání, The Benjamin Cummings Publishing Company, Inc., Menlo Park, California, 1979
2.Campbell, J.: Chemical Systems, W. H. Freeman and Company, San Francisco, 1970

Course:General Chemistry 215CH2Ing. Motl Alois CSc.-2+1 Z,ZK-3
Abstract:The subject is the continuation of the course General chemistry I. The main attention is paid to general principles governing chemical processes. Using various examples, the fact that the validity of these principles is not restricted only to chemical processes is documented. The significance and practical use of explained principles are illustrated by examples solved in exercises.
Outline:1. The scope of chemical thermodynamics, thermodynamic description of the
the state of a system and its changes, standard states, state functions and
their properties, internal energy, enthalpy, the first law of thermodynamics,
introducing of the concept of reversible / irreversible processes illustrated on
the example of the isothermal volume change of an ideal gas.
2. Application of the first law, Lavoisier-Laplace law, Hess law, ther
thermochemistry, the heats of chemical reactions, the heats of phase
transitions, thermochemical calculations.
3. Thermic and statistic concept of the state function entropy, the seco
second law of thermodynamics and its consequences, introducing of the state
function Gibbs energy.
4. The conditions for thermodynamic equilibrium. Important phase equi
equilibria, characterisation and quantitative description.
5. The concept of the reversible (equilibrium) chemical reac
reaction, chemical equilibria, the thermodynamic activity of the component of a
system expressed by concentration quantities. The equilibrium constant of a
reaction, Guldberg-Waag law (the law of mass action) and its use in the
calculations of equilibrium composition of a reaction mixture.
6. Reaction quotient, making the decision on the direction of a reac
reaction run. Le Chatelier's principle (action - reaction principle) and its
application, possibilities to shift the position of chemical equilibrium (to
change the equilibrium composition of a reaction mixture).
7. Equilibria in electrolytes water solutions, the auto-dissociation of w
of water, water ion product, acids and bases - the concept of Brönsted and
Lowry. Conjugated pairs acid-base, pH scale, the calculation of the pH value of
the solutions of the strong acids (bases) either without or with the involvement
of water auto-dissociation.
8. Weak acids (bases), dissociation constant, the equilibrium degree of d
of dissociation, the calculations of pH value of the solutions of the weak acids
(bases) either without or with the involvement of water auto-dissociation.
9. The solutions of salts, hydrolysis, hydrolytic constant, the equi
equilibrium degree of hydrolysis, pH-value calculations of the solutions of
hydrolysable salts.
10. The mixtures of strong acids (bases) and weak acids (bases), the mix
mixtures strong acid + weak acid (strong base + weak base), buffers, pH-value
calculations.
11. Polyprotic acids (bases), pH-value calculations, equilibria in the sol
solutions of sparingly soluble electrolytes, solubility product, its use for the
calculation of molar solubility.
12. The rate of chemical reaction, the differential form of the rate law (ki
(kinetic equation), reaction order, rate constant, Arrhenius' equation,
activation energy, the influence of the temperature on the reaction rate.
13. The integration of a differential rate law, reaction mixture com
composition on the time, first order reactions, selected systems of the first
order reactions, their similarities with the relations describing the kinetics
of radioactive decay.
14. Kinetics of selected systems involving more reactants and the rea
reactions of higher order.
Outline (exercises):1.Applications of the first law of thermodynamics, thermochemical laws and calculations.
2.Chemical and phase equilibria, calculation of equilibrium composition of system.
3.Equilibria in the solutions of electrolytes, the pH calculations of: the solutions of strong acids/bases without/with a respect to water auto-ionization, the solutions of weak acids/bases without/with a respect to water auto-ionization.
4.The pH calculations of: acids mixtures, bases mixtures, solutions of hydrolysable salts.
5.Solubility product calculations.
6.Fundamentals of chemical kinetics, the use of integrated kinetic equations for calculations.
7.Calculations based on Arrhenius' equation.
Goals:The students of non-chemical specializations gain sufficient knowledge in general principles governing chemical processes (reactions).
Graduate of this course is able to decide, whether a process will take place under given condition and what will be its result.
Requirements:Chemistry knowledge at the level of the subject General chemistry I.
Key words:Chemical thermodynamics, internal energy, enthalpy, thermochemistry, entropy, Gibbs energy, phase equilibrium, chemical equilibrium, electrchemistry, electrolyte, dissociation, pH ? scale, reaction kinetics, rate law, kinetic equation, rate constant, Arrhenius' law
ReferencesKey references:
1.Chang, R.: Chemistry, ninth edition, McGraw-Hill, New York, 2007
2.Zumdahl, S.: Chemical Principles, D. C. Heath and Company, Canada, USA,1992
Recommended references:
1.Dickerson, R., Gray, H., Haight, G.: Chemical Principles, 3.vydání, The Benjamin Cummings Publishing Company, Inc., Menlo Park, California, 1979
2.Campbell, J.: Chemical Systems, W. H. Freeman and Company, San Francisco, 1970

Introduction to Engineering17UINZ Bílý, Haušild, Mušálek 2+1 z,zk - - 3 -
Course:Introduction to Engineering17UINZMgr. Bouda Jaroslav2+1 Z,ZK-3-
Abstract:The course is devoted to an introduction to the engineering profession. Students will gradually learn the characteristics and specialties of engineering work, including an overview of the basics of selected engineering disciplines, such as the basics of materials science, manufacturing technology, quality control and assurance and ecology. Further, the course will focus on some issues of R&D activities organization and on selected parts of technical drawings and the work with AutoCAD code.
Outline:Course organization. Methodology of engineering work. Industrial safety
Time range: 1 lecture
Introduction, engineering profession, nuclear engineer and his place in engineering, present role of engineer, university education of future engineers (introduction, embodiment, connections, importance, literature, historical introduction to present time).
Industrial safety a occupational health protection (importance and role of industrial safety; classification of rules of law according to their legal force; labour code, staff qualification; rules of law revision and harmonization with EC.

Introduction to technical drawing - technical drawing aspects
Time range: 1 lecture
Technical drawing importance, drawing features, standards and standardization in Czech Republic, kinds of drawings, drawing formats, drawing parts, word and additional data, drawing corrections, projection types, their advantages and disadvantages and application in engineering profession, oblique projection, orthogonal projection, projection rules for technical drawing, projection to auxiliary projection plane


Introduction to technical drawing - making a technical drawing
Time range: 1 lecture
Line types, scale, lettering of drawings, drawings of component, drawings of assemblies, technical projection, crosscut and cross section, drawing simplification, reading of drawings, electrotechnical drawings

Introduction to technical drawing - dimensioning
Time range: 1 lecture
Basic concept. Dimensioning types, Surface quality and processing method prescriptions. Dimension tolerances. Drawing and dimensioning of basic geometric shapes and components. Representation of machine components.

Introduction to technical drawing - AutoCAD code
Time range: 1 lecture
Drawing routines simplification, reasons for simplifications, used methods and their comparison, use of automatization, use of computers

Introduction to technical drawing - AutoCAD code
Time range: 1 lecture
AutoCAD code work principles, options and benefits of the code, practical training

Basics of materiál science
Time range: 1 lecture
Crystalline and amorphous materials, metal classification, crystalline structure of metals, alloys, crystallization of metals and alloys, properties of materials, iron alloys, nonferrous metals and alloys, nonmetallic materials.

Basics of materiál science
Time range: 1 lecture
Casting, forming (rolling, drawing, extruding, forging, pressing), welding and soldering, cutting machining (turning, drilling, planing, milling, grinding), heat treatment, combined processing methods, tests of metal properties.

Basics of materiál science
Time range: 1 lecture
Plastics, its genesis, classification, basic properties of plastics, plastics processing technologies

Quality control and assurance
Time range: 1 lecture
Importance and need of quality assurance, principles of quality control and assurance, classification of selected components, quality assurance programs and field of activities in which they are elaborated, requirements on documentation, quality control assurance organisation and role of state supervision

Data handling. Measurements and experiments
Time range: 1 lecture
Importance of data for R&D activities, data sources, data sorting, data handling, use of computers for data handling, role of measurement in manufacturing proces, measuring methods, basic measuring techniques, measurement outputs processing, measurement protocols and reports, evaluation of experiments

Relation of engineering work to environment protection
Time range: 1 lecture
Relation of human being to the environment, environment as a closed systém, influence of human activities on the environment and vice versa, means of environmental care - outcomes, radioactivity in the environment
Outline (exercises):Training of technical drawing, training of technical drawing using AutoCAD code, presentation of outcomes of given topic literature search, discussion on topics from required literature
Goals:Knowledge: labour code, basic types and properties of technical materials, basic rules of making the technical drawing in engineering, basics of drawing on PC, data handling, physical quantities and units, rules for measurements, requirements on quality assurance in industry, human - environment interaction

Abilities: orientation in the field, utilization of obtained knowledge in further courses
Requirements:-
Key words:engineering profession, industrial safety and occupational health protection, technical drawing, AutoCAD, metallic materials, non-metallic materials, plastics, quality control and assurance, data handling, measurement in technical practice, environment
ReferencesKey references:
Sodomka,J. a kol.: Introduction to Engineering, Ediční středisko ČVUT, Prague, 1977, (in Czech)
Pospíchal Jaroslav: Technical drawing, ČVUT, Praha, 2000, (in Czech)
Macur Jiří, Novotná, Helena, Trnková, Hana: AutoCAD, VUT v Brně, Brno, 1995, (in Czech)

Recommended references:
Mádr Vilém, Knejzlík Jaromír, Kopečný Jan, Novotný Ivo: Physical measurement, SNTL, Praha, 1991, (in Czech)

Media and tools:
PC room, AutoCAD code

Experimental Physics 102EXF1 Chaloupka, Petráček - - 2+0 z - 2
Course:Experimental Physics 102EXF1RNDr. Chaloupka Petr Ph.D. / doc. RNDr. Petráček Vojtěch CSc.-2+0 Z-2
Abstract:Lecture represents an introductory course in experimental physics. Students will learn methods of measurement of basic physical quantities and methods of measurement evaluation.
Outline:1.Introduction to measurement of physical quantities
2.Errors of measurement
3.Evaluation of measurement
4.Monte Carlo simulations
5.Optical instruments, measurement of length
6.Measurement of mass, weighting
7.Measurement of density
8.Measurement of acceleration
9.Measurement of elasticity
10.Measurement of work and power
11.Measurement of viskosity and flow velocity
12.Measurement of pressure, Vacuum technology
Outline (exercises):
Goals:Knowledge:
Basic experimental methods and routines in broad field of physics

Abilities:
Orientation in methods of experimental physics
Requirements:Knowledge of basic course of physics
Key words:measurement of physical quantities, Monte Carlo, simulations
ReferencesKey references:
[1] Brož: Fundamentals of Physical Measurenment I., SNTL 1983 (in Czech)

Recommended references:
[2] Kolektiv KF: Physical laboratories I., ČVUT Praha 1989 (in Czech)

Preparatory Week00PT FJFI 1 týden z - - 2 -
Course:Preparatory Week00PTtýden Z-2-
Abstract:
Outline:
Outline (exercises):
Goals:
Requirements:
Key words:
References

Výuka jazyků04. KJ - - - - - -

Optional courses

Introductory Atomic and Nuclear Physics02ZAJF Wagner - - 2+2 z,zk - 4
Course:Introductory Atomic and Nuclear Physics02ZAJFRNDr. Wagner Vladimír CSc.-2+2 Z,ZK-4
Abstract:Brief review of microworld phenomena and their physical description. The goal is to provide basics of quantum theory, atomic, nuclear, and elementary-particle physics.
Outline:1.Inadequacy of classical description regarding microworld phenomena
2.Basics of quantum theory
3.Atomic structure
4.Nuclei and their basic characteristics
5.Radioactivity
6.Nuclear reactions
7.Elementary particles and interactions
8.Interaction of radiation with matter
9.Accelerators
10.Applied nuclear physics
Outline (exercises):1. Fotoefect, Compton scattering, Gravitational redshift
2. Thomson and Bohr model
3. Wawes
4. Schroedinger equation
5. Atomic nuclei and their characteristics
6. Rutherford scattering
7. Liquid drop model
8. Radioactivity
9. Nuclear reactions
10. Charged particle in electromagnetic field
Goals:Knowledge:
Orientation in the physics of microworld

Skills:
Ability to apply knowledge of the physics of microworld on particular problems
Requirements:Middle level knowledge of mathematics and physics
Key words:Quantum theory, atomic physics, nuclear physics, elementary particles
ReferencesKey references:
[1] A. Beiser: "Concepts of Modern Physics" (in Czech), chap. 3-11, 21-25, Academia Praha 1978
[2] J. R. Lamarsh, A. J. Barrata: Introduction to Nuclear Engineering" (chap. 2,3),Prentice Hall, 2001

Recommended references:
[3] I. Úlehla, M. Suk, Z. Trka: "Atoms, Nuclei, Particles" (in Czech) , Academia Praha 1990
[4] P. Reuss: "Neutron Physics", EDP Sciences, France 2008

Basics of Power Engineering and Energy Sources17EZE Kobylka, Tichý 2+0 z,zk - - 3 -
Course:Basics of Power Engineering and Energy Sources17EZEIng. Kobylka Dušan Ph.D.2+0 Z,ZK-3-
Abstract:The main purpose of this course is to transmit to students the basic information about energy sector as the part of economics, about its wide range, all important parts and about patterns of energy sector function. The course is - from the beginning - structured logically from definition of term "energetics? through the power consumption, power sources on Earth, fuel mining and its influence on our environment, to the transformation of fuel power to nobler types of power. This course describes power plants from the view as a device being used for the power transformation mostly from the view of their features for connection to energy network, how they influence the environment and national economy, etc. It contains also power network features, their managing and structures, description of power networks in Europe and in the Czech Republic. The final part of this course is pointed to energetics of the Czech Republic and the State energy policy.
Outline:1. Definition of "energy sector", its division and energy consumption
Scope: 1 lecture

Limitation of energy sector, division of energy sector to parts, power engineering history and energy consumption in the World, energy sources: fossil fuel (solid, liquid and gaseous), renewable energy sources and their basic features.


2. Sources and fuels mining on Earth
Scope: 2 lectures
Reserves of basic fuels (solid fossil fuels, liquid fossil fuels, gaseous fossil fuels, nuclear fuels) on the Earth, their deposits an present mining, mining history, flow of energy raw materials in the World (transport, import, export), basic influence of mining on environment, forecasting.

3. Energy consumption, electricity
Scope: 2 lectures
Production - consumption equality, primary energy consumption in the World according to regions, energy consumption in the World according to fuels, energy consumption per capita, non-uniformity of consumption in the World, development of consumption in history and forecasting, influence of consumption on life quality, energy consumption in economy, fuels in economy, production and consumption of electricity, import and export of electricity, daily load curve, electricity accumulation.

4. Nuclear power in the World and basic features of nuclear power plant
Scope: 1 lecture
Nuclear power in the World, amount of operated nuclear reactors in various countries, forecasting, basic nuclear reactors types (PWR, BWR, CANDU, gas cooled reactors, RBMK, fast reactors, Generation IV) and their contribution in energy sector, basic features of particular nuclear power plant types (safety, fuel cycle, efficiency, operation experience, economy, influence on environment, forecasting, ?).

5. Power plants based on renewable energy sources
Scope: 1 lecture
Hydroelectric power plants (division of hydroelectric power plants, description of hydroelectric power plants, turbine types, basic features of hydroelectric power plants), wind power plants (principle, rotors, efficiency, weather map, basic features of wind power plants), solar energy (types of use, division of wind power plants, photovoltaics, efficiency, basic features of wind power plants)

6. Fossil-fuel power plant and biomass
Scope: 2 lectures
Basic description of fossil-fuel power plant, boilers types and their principles (stocker-fired, fluid, dry-bottom, pulverized fuel, cyclone, ?), basic description of power plant components (coal feeding, boiler, filters, flue gas desulphurization, ?), basic features of power plants (efficiency, operational experiences, economy), influence on environment (gaseous emission and their reduction, solid wastes, ?), liquid fuel boiler, gaseous fuel boiler, internal combustion turbines and motors in power engineering, biomass boilers.
Rozsah: 1 přednáška
7. Energy supply system, hydrogen power engineering
Scope: 1 lecture
Electricity supply system: transmission network system, types of networks according to voltage, components of networks (wires, towers, etc.), transmission network system in Europe and their connection, European electricity business, transmission network system in the Czech republic, basic description of gas supply system and oil supply system, features of hydrogen power engineering (principle, hydrogen production and use)

8. Energy sector in the Czech Republic and the State energy policy
Scope: 2 lectures
Energy consumption in the Czech Republic, fuels and their contribution in energy supply, renewable energy sources, the most important power plants in the Czech Republic (EDU, ETE, Prunéřov, Mělník, Dlouhé stráně, Orlík), forecasting - the State energy policy.

9. Students reports
Scope: 1 lecture
Presentation of student?s reports prepared according to given topics.

Outline (exercises):-
Goals:Basic knowledge of power engineering, energy sources and fuels, energy transformations a their influence on environment, knowledge of basic power plants descriptions and their features, description of energy sector in the Czech Republic and its forecasting (the State energy policy).
Orientation in issue, ability of logical thinking in the power engineering
Requirements:-
Key words:power engineering, energy sector, electricity, energy sources, coal, oil, natural gas, fuel mining, nuclear power plant, fossil-fuel power plant, boiler, renewable energy sources, water power plant, photovoltaics, transmission network system, energy sector in the Czech Republic, the State energy policy
ReferencesKey references:
BP: BP Statistical Review of World Energy, London, 2009

Recommended references:
WWW sites of Energy regulatory office: http://www.eru.cz/
The Ministry of Industry and Trade: The energy vision of the Czech Republic, Nakladatelstvi Arch, Praha 2005, ISBN: 80-86165-98-1


Experimental Laboratory02PRAK Škoda - - 0+4 kz - 4
Course:Experimental Laboratory02PRAKIng. Škoda Libor-0+4 KZ-4
Abstract:Lecture is intended primarily for students who study branch Nuclear Chemistry engineering, or practically oriented bachelor's specializations of branch Nuclear engineering. But it can be also visited by students interested in the other specializations. During Experimental laboratory, students learn how to prepare for experiments (including work with the literature), the implementation of the measurement (acquire of different experimental procedures and routines), will teach writing the records of measurement, processing and evaluation of results. At the same time practically extend the knowledge gained in lectures on physics.
Outline:
Outline (exercises):1.Gas thermometer, latent heat of water vaporization.
2.Volume measurements, determination of the Poisson constant.
3.Harmonic oscillation. RLC circuits.
4.Line spectra of Hg and Na spectral lamps using prism spectrometer.
5.Geometrical optics. Photometry.
6.Spectrum of gamma radiation.
7.Heat engine and heat efficiency.
8.Interference and diffraction of light.
9.Air bench - The Law of Conservation of Energy, crashes.
10.Specific electron charge, energy loss of alpha particles in gases.
Goals:Knowledge:
Advanced experimental and analytic methods and experimental procedures

Abilities:
Application of the mentioned methods on specific physical experiments, processing and evaluation of results
Requirements:Knowledge of basic course of physics
Key words:Experiments on mechanics, wave physics, electrics, magnetism, wave physics, thermodynamics and nuclear physics
ReferencesKey references:
[1] Kolektiv KF: Physics I - Laporatory excersisies, ČVUT Praha 1998 (in Czech)

Recommended references:
[2] J.D.Wilson, C.A.Hernandez: Physics Laboratory Experiments, Brooks Cole Boston 2004
[3] E. Veselá, V. Vacek: Handbook of Laboratory Experiments in Physics, ČVUT, 2017

Media and tools:
laboratory of the department of physics

Mathematics 101MAT12 Fučík 6 z 6 z 4 4
Course:Mathematics 101MAT1Ing. Fučík Radek Ph.D.6 Z-4-
Abstract:The course is devoted to the study of the basics of calculus of one variable. It includes an introduction to differential and integral calculus, with particular emphasis on applications in practical problems.
Outline:1. Functions and their properties.
2. Limits of functions.
3. Continuity.
4. The derivative, tangent to a curve, some differentiation formulas, derivatives of higher order.
5. Rolle's theorem, the mean value theorem (Lagrange). Extreme values, asymptotes, concavity and point of inflections, curve sketching.
6. The definite integral. The antiderivate function, indefinite integral, substitution, integration by parts. Newton's theorem, the area calculation. Primitive functions to trigonometric functions, mean integral.
7. The transcendental functions: logarithm function, e number, exponential function, hyperbolic functions.
8. Applications of the definite integral: the length of a curve, the volume and the area of a revolved curve.
Outline (exercises):1. Functions and their properties: domain of definition, range, inverse, absolute value, inequalities, quadratic inequalities, graphs, composition of functions, polynomials, division of polynomials.
2. Limits of functions: the limits of basic functions, the limits of trigonometric functions.
3. Continuity: The investigation of continuity of functions from the definition, identification of types of discontinuities.
4. Derivatives: derivative computation by definition, rules for derivatives of basic functions, tangents, higher order derivatives.
5. Rolle's theorem, the mean value theorem (Lagrange). Extreme values, asymptotes, concavity and point of inflections, curve sketching.
6. Integral calculus: the antiderivate functions, the method of substitution, the method of integration by parts, advanced techniques of integration of trigonometric functions, definite integrals, Newton's formula.
7. Transcendental functions: logarithm definition, characteristics, exponential, hyperbolic and trigonometric functions and their derivatives.
8. Applications of the definite integral: area under the graph of the function, length of a graph, volume and surface the area of a revolved curve.

Goals:Knowledge:
Elementary notions of mathematical analysis of the differential and integral calculus of functions of one real variable.

Abilities:
Understanding the basics of mathematical logic and mathematical analysis.
Requirements:
Key words:Differential calculus, integral calculus, functions of one real variable, limits, extremes of functions.
ReferencesKey references:
[1] Calculus, One Variable, S.L.Salas, Einar Hille, John Wiley and Sons, New York, Chichester, Brisbane, Toronto, Singapore, 1990 (6th edition), ISBN 0-471-51749-6
[2] Larson, Ron, and Bruce H. Edwards. Calculus of a single variable: Early transcendental functions. Cengage Learning, 2014.
[3] Pelantová, Edita, Vondráčková, Jana: Cvičení z matematické analýzy, ČVUT, Praha 2015
[4] Stewart, James. Single variable calculus: Early transcendentals. Nelson Education, 2015.

Course:Mathematics 201MAT2Ing. Fučík Radek Ph.D.-6 Z-4
Abstract:The course, which is the continuation of Mathematics 1, is devoted to the integration techniques, improper Riemann integral, introduction to parametric curves (especially in polar coordinates), the basics of sequences and infinite series, and finally to the Taylor and power series and their applications.
Outline:1. Integration techniques.
2. The improper integral and the convergence criteria.
3. Conic sections: ellipse, hyperbole, parable.
4. Polar coordinates.
5. Parametric curves: length of a curve, tangent to a curve, surfaces, volumes and surfaces of revolution.
6. Sequences: limits of sequences, important limits, the convergence criteria.
7. Series: the convergence criteria, absolute and non-absolute convergence, alternating series.
8. Power series. Differentiation and integration of power series.
9. Taylor polynomial and Taylor series.
Outline (exercises):1. Advanced integration techniques: integrals of rational functions, partial fractions, integration of trigonometric functions.
2. Improper Riemann integral: calculating improper integrals, convergence criteria.
3. Conic sections: circle, ellipse, hyperbole, parable, conic sections identification, description of conics through the distance between points and between a point and a line.
4. Polar coordinates: the transformation of points and equations between the cartesian and polar coordinates.
5. Parametric curves: length of a curve, tangent to the curve, surfaces, volumes and surfaces of revolution.
6. Properties of sets: finding suprema and infima of sets.
7. Sequences: limits of sequences, important limits, convergence criteria.
8. Infinite series: convergence criteria, absolute and relative convergence, alternating series.
9. Power series: convergence criteria, differentiation and integration of power series, sum of infinite series.
10. Taylor polynomials and Taylor series: the expansion of important functions in power series.
Goals:Knowledge:
Advanced integration techniques, improper Riemann integral, numerical sequences, and infinite power series.

Abilities:
Understanding the basics of mathematical logic and mathematical analysis. Taylor series expansion.
Requirements:Mathematics 1.
Key words:Differential calculus, integral calculus, functions of one variable, numerical sequences, infinite series, power series, Taylor series.
ReferencesKey references:
[1] Calculus, One Variable, S.L.Salas, Einar Hille, John Wiley and Sons, New York, Chichester, Brisbane, Toronto, Singapore, 1990 (6th edition), ISBN 0-471-51749-6
[2] Larson, Ron, and Bruce H. Edwards. Calculus of a single variable: Early transcendental functions. Cengage Learning, 2014.
[3] Pelantová, Edita, Vondráčková, Jana: Cvičení z matematické analýzy, ČVUT, Praha 2015
[4] Stewart, James. Single variable calculus: Early transcendentals. Nelson Education, 2015.

Mathematics, Examination 101MATZ12 Fučík - zk - zk 2 2
Course:Mathematics, Examination 101MATZ1Ing. Fučík Radek Ph.D.- ZK-2-
Abstract:
Outline:
Outline (exercises):
Goals:
Requirements:
Key words:
References

Course:Mathematics, Examination 201MATZ2Ing. Fučík Radek Ph.D. / Ing. Tušek Matěj Ph.D.-- ZK-2
Abstract:
Outline:
Outline (exercises):
Goals:
Requirements:
Key words:
References

Heat and Molecular Physics02TER Jizba - - 2+2 z,zk - 4
Course:Heat and Molecular Physics02TERIng. Mgr. Jizba Petr Ph.D.-2+2 Z,ZK-4
Abstract:1. thermal expansion of materials, heat transfer
2. stationary and non-stationary heat conduction, heat transfer and penetration
3. 1st and 2nd thermodynamic principle, ideal and real gas, entropy
4. non-chemical systems: dielectric and magnetic materials
5. Maxwell relations and thermodynamic potentials
6. kinetic theory: Maxwell's velocity distribution, ekvipartition theorem
Outline:1. Thermal linearplane and volume expansions. Thermal expansivity of gas.
2. Transport of heat:conduction,convection and radiation.Stationar conduction in thermally isolated and unisolated systems.
3. Non-stationar conduction. Common heat conduction equation.
4. Surface heat transfer.
5. The zeroth and first law of thermodynamics. Thermodynamic process in ideal gas.The second law of thermodynamics. Carnot cycle. The Clausius unequality.
6. Entropy of homogeneous chemical system. The Gibbs paradoxon.
7. Common temperature, thermodynamic temperature.
8. Thermodymamic variables of non-chemical systems.
9. The heat capacity KV and Kp.
10. The third law of thermodynamics.
11. The equipartitionon theorem and its consequences.
12. The Maxwell law of distribution of molecular velocities.
13. The van der Waals gas. The Joule and Tomson experiment. Condensation of gases.
Outline (exercises):1)Thermal expansion.
2)Transport of heat. Stationary and non-stationary heat conduction.
3)Heat transfer and heat penetration.
4)The zeroth and first law of thermodynamics. Thermodynamic processes in ideal gas.
5)The second law of thermodynamics, Carnot cyclus. General cyclic process.
5)Entropy of homogeneous chemical system. Exchange entropy.
6)TThe heat capacity KV and Kp.
7)The third law of thermodynamics.
8)The real gas. The van der Waals equation of state.
Goals:knowledge:
knowledge of basic thermodynamic phenomena in chemical (and some non-chemical) systems.


abilities:
application of the mathematical and conceptual formalism of thermodynamics on concrete practical examples from physical and engineering praxis
Requirements:knowledge of differential and integral calculus on the level of basic undergraduate courses
Key words:heat, molecular physics, thermodynamical laws
ReferencesKey references:
1)latěk Maršák: Thermodynamics and Statistical Physics,ČVUT, Praha, 2000. (in Czech)
2)Zlatěk Maršák, Eva Havránková : Collection of solved excersisies in physics,ČVUT,Praha, 2004. (in Czech)

Recommended references:
1)J.Kvasnica, Thermodynamics, (SNTL,1965) (in Czech)
2)K.Huang, Statistical Physics, (Wiley
1987, 2002)
3)F.Reif, Fundamentals of statistical and
thermal physics, (McGraw-Hill, 1965)

Essentials of High School Course 100MAM1 Břeň 0+1 z - - 1 -
Course:Essentials of High School Course 100MAM1----
Abstract:
Outline:
Outline (exercises):
Goals:
Requirements:
Key words:
References

Essentials of High School Math Course 200MAM2 Pošta 0+1 z - - 1 -
Course:Essentials of High School Math Course 200MAM2doc. Ing. Pošta Severin Ph.D.----
Abstract:Review of basics of high school mathematics.
Outline:1. Real numbers, powers, roots, expressions, mathematical induction.
2. Functions, equations and inequalities linear, quadratic and those involving roots and radicals.
3. Functions, equations and inequalities involving exponentials and logarithms.
4. Functions, equations and inequalities involving gonimetric functions.
5. Complex numbers, combinatorics, binomial theorem, analytic geometry in the plane and in the space.
6. Review.
7. Final test.
Outline (exercises):
Goals:To repeat the basics of high school mathematics, necessary for successful passing the basic calculus and linear algebra courses.
Requirements:No prerequisities.
Key words:highschool mathematics
ReferencesRecommended references:
[1] J. Polák: Středoškolská matematika v úlohách I, Prometheus, 2007
[2] J. Polák: Středoškolská matematika v úlohách II, 2008
[3] I. Bušek: Řešené maturitní úlohy z matematiky, Prometheus 2004


Physical Seminar 102FYS1 Svoboda 0+2 z - - 2 -
Course:Physical Seminar 102FYS1Ing. Svoboda Vojtěch CSc.0+2 Z-2-
Abstract:The seminar is devoted to detailed study of interesting physical problems. It should help students to deeper understanding of fundamentals of physics presented in the course of Mechanics. The problems are chosen, studied and presented by the students themselves, with the possibility to use PC and physical laboratory equipments.
Outline:1. Introductory presentation.
2. Invited presentation "To the roots of physics".
3. How to make a good physical presentation.
4.-12. Individual student's presentations.
Outline (exercises):Individual student's presentations.
Goals:Knowledge:
- To acquaint students with scientific communication forms.
- Applied science phenomena demonstrations.


Skills:
- Individual research, theoretical, numerical and experimental student work.
- Physical slide show preparation and presentation.
Requirements:Parallel participation on the Mechanics lecture.
Individual creative student's ability.
PC basic skills.
Key words:Physics, experiments, demonstrations, numerical modeling, presentation.
ReferencesKey references:
[1] V. Svoboda, WWW pages of physical seminar (in Czech). URL: http://fyzsem.fjfi.cvut.cz . [cit: 2010-11-20]

Recommended references:
[1] Physics WWW pages , URL: http://fyzport.fjfi.cvut.cz [cit: 2010-11-20]
[2] A. P. Tipler: Physics I, II. Worth Publisher, 1976.
[3]C.R.Nave, Hyperphysics.http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/hph.html [cit: 2010-11-20]
[4] T. Henderson, Physics Classroom. URL: http://www.physicsclassroom.com/
[5] D.Halliday a R.Resnick a J. Walker, Fundamentals of physics. J. Wiley 2001

Media and tools:
-Physical Laboratory of the Dept. of Physics FNSPE.
-PC rooms.

Foundations of Physical Measurements 102ZFM12 Chaloupka, Škoda 2+0 z 0+2 z 2 2
Course:Foundations of Physical Measurements 102ZFM1RNDr. Chaloupka Petr Ph.D. / Ing. Škoda Libor2+0 Z-2-
Abstract:This introductory course is devoted to the essentials of measurements of the most important physical quantities. It is especially recommended to those students who are going to study one of the physicas curricula - Physical engineering and Nuclear engineering. Also the methods of evaluation of statistical data using PC and practical work with measurement devices is involved. Students learn main rules connected with experimental work in physical laboratory.
Outline:1.Physical quantities and units
2.Basic measurement methods
3.General structure of experiment
4.Basic notions of statistic
5.Evaluation of statistical data related to results and errors of measurements
6.Computer data processing
7.Measurement methodology concerning length, area, volume, time, mass, mechanical and heat quantities
8.Measurement methodology of electrical quantities - analog and digital devices oscilloscope, XY writer, frequency generator
9.Computer in experimental practice
10.Presentation of experimental results
Outline (exercises):
Goals:Knowledge:
Basic principles of physical measurement, analytic methods

Skills:
Main rules connected with experimental work in physical laboratory
Requirements:Knowledge of basic course of physics
Key words:Physical measurements, data analysis
ReferencesKey references:
[1] J.Brož: Fundamentals of Physical Measurement. SNTL Praha 1983 (in Czech)

Recommended references:
[2] Zebrowski Jr., E.: Fundamentals of Physical Measurement, Duxbury Press 1979

Course:Foundations of Physical Measurements 202ZFM2RNDr. Chaloupka Petr Ph.D. / Ing. Škoda Libor-0+2 Z-2
Abstract:This introductory course is devoted to the essentials of measurements of the most important physical quantities. It is especially recommended to those students who are going to study one of the physicas curricula - Physical engineering and Nuclear engineering. Also the methods of evaluation of statistical data using PC and practical work with measurement devices is involved. Students learn main rules connected with experimental work in physical laboratory.
Outline:
Outline (exercises):1.Density of liquid and solid materials
2.Analog and digital devices
3.Oscilloscope
4.XY writer
5.Frequency generator
6.Measurement of resistance and capacity
7.VA characteristics of a resistor and a semiconductor diode
8.Rotation frequency of an electrical engine
9.Computer data processing
10.Relation between temperature and resistance of thermistor
Goals:Knowledge:
Basic principles of physical measurement, analytic methods

Skills:
Main rules connected with experimental work in physical laboratory
Requirements:Knowledge of the basic course of physics
Key words:Physical measurements, data analysis
ReferencesKey references:
[1] J.Brož: Fundamentals of Physical Measurement. SNTL Praha 1983 (in Czech)

Recommended references:
[2] Zebrowski Jr., E.: Fundamentals of Physical Measurement, Duxbury Press 1979

Media and tools:
laboratory

Basic Work with PC16ZPSP Vrba T. 0+2 z - - 2 -
Course:Basic Work with PC16ZPSPdoc. Ing. Vrba Tomáš Ph.D.----
Abstract:The aim of the subject is to teach basic skills associated with a personal computer. The introductory part of the course is devoted to information systems and resources available to the CTU and PNSPE students. Another part summarizes basic information about computer hardware, software and security. Most of the course is devoted to exercises whose aim is to teach students to use office software (word processor, spreadsheet, presentation software) at a level that is required in other courses of study (practice, undergraduate thesis, research and thesis).
Outline:
Outline (exercises):1) Introduction to Computer Science and Information Technology at CTU, the legal standards
2) Hardware (general principles, knowledge for the selection of PCs)
3) Software (sorting, summary, licenses) and basic functions of OS
4) IT security (viruses, firewalls, spyware, phishing, certificates, encryption ...)
5) Word Processing I - The philosophy and basic functions
6) Word Processing II. - Formatting templates
7) Word Processing III. - Advanced features, major projects (basic rules for DTP)
8) Spreadsheet I - The philosophy and basic functions
9) Spreadsheet II. - Formulas, built-in functions, formatting
10) Spreadsheet III. - Accessories, solver, macros
11) Presentation tools - an overview of key features (principles of formatting)
12) Test
Goals:Knowledge:
Information technologies available to the students on CTU
. Basic knowledge of WH and SW.
Computer security.

Skills:
Working with office software (Word, Excel, PowerPoint).
Search in electronic sources and work with a bibliography.
Requirements:There are no prerequisities.
Key words:IT, PC, text processor, table calculator
References
Key references:
[1] Materials on the server https://behounek.fjfi.cvut.cz
[2] Josef Pecinovský: Microsoft Office 2013 Podrobná uživatelská příručka, COMPUTER PRESS


Recommended references
[3] Marie Franců: Jak zvládnout testy ECDL, COMPUTER PRESS, ISBN 978-80-251-2653-0

Basics of Algorithmization18ZALG Virius - - 2+2 z,zk - 4
Course:Basics of Algorithmization18ZALGdoc. Ing. Virius Miroslav CSc.-2+2 Z,ZK-4
Abstract:This course is devoted to selected algorithms and methods for algorithm design. This course intruduces selected methods for the determination of the algorithm complexity.
Outline:1. Algorithm, its description, its complexity
2. Data structures
3. Algorithm design methods
4. Recursion.
5. Ordering(sorting)
6. Balanced trees, optimal trees.
7. Seminumerical algorithms:
Outline (exercises):The sylabus of the excercises is the same as the sylabus of the lecture.
Goals:Knowledge:
Common algorithms (such as sorting) and common data structurs (such as the list, the tree, the hash table).

Ability:
Using the usual methods for algorithm design and in selected cases determining the algorithm complexity.
Requirements:Basic of programming
Key words:algorithm;complexity;list;tree;b-tree;hash table;graph;recursion;divide and conquer;greedy method;duynamic programming;backtracking;Monte Carlo method;sorting;balanced tree;number system;seminumerical algorithms
ReferencesKey references:[1] Virius, M.: Základy algoritmizace v C++. 3. vydání. Praha, ČVUT 2014. ISBN 978-80-01-05606-6
(in Czech).
Recommended references:
[1] Knuth, Donald E. The Art of the Computer Programming. Vol. 1, 2, 3. Addison-Wesley Professional 1998. ISBN: 0201485419
[2] Wirth, N. Algorithms + Data Structures = Programs. Prentice Hall 1975.
[3] Topfer, P. Algoritmy a programovací techniky. Praha, Prometheus 1995.

History of Physics 102DEF1 Jex, Myška 2+0 z - - 2 -
Course:History of Physics 102DEF1prof. Ing. Jex Igor DrSc.2+0 Z-2-
Abstract:Physics and its place in the system of sciences. The relationship of man and nature. Natural sciences in ancient Orient and Greece, Greek natural philosophers, Aristotle. Physics in Helenistic period, Archimed. Arabic science, European science in Middle Ages. Renaissance - da Vinci, Giordano Bruno. Copernicus, Kepler, Galileo, Huygens. The birth of physics as experimental science. Newton and his work.
Outline:1. Physics and its place in the system of sciences., the relationship of man and nature. 2. The origin of man, thinking and culture. 3.The science in ancient Orient, Egypt, India and China. 4. Greek natural philosophy, atomists. 5. Aristotelian physics. 6. Physics in helenistic period, Archimed. 7. Arabian science. 8. Science in medieval Europe. 9. Copernicus and heliocentrism. 10. Physics during the Renaissance. 11. Kepler and Galilei. 12.Scientific revolution in the 17th century. 13. Newton and the origin of classicak mechanics.
Outline (exercises):
Goals:Knowledge:
Obtain global view at the beginning of physical thinking and knowledge from the very origin to the New Ages Further task is to demonstrate how the logical and mathematically founded picture of nature replaced the original mythological concepts and to stress the contribution of the nations of old Orient and antic Greece. Also to show how the development of science and technology during European Middle Ages resulted into the experimentally based scientific revolution which opened the road to our technical civilization of today.

Abilities:
According to personal interests to broaden one's knowledge by further study of literature, be able to work with the historical sources and to prepare essays on the chosen thema from this period of physics..

Requirements:General knowledge of history of mankind and basic laws of physics at high school level.
Key words:history, physics, antics, middle ages
ReferencesKey references:
[1] I. Štoll: History of Physics, Praha, Prometheus 2009 (in Czech)
[2] I. Kraus: Physics from Thales to Newton, Praha, Academia 2007 (in Czech)
[3] D. Wootton: The Invention of Science: A New History of the Scientific Revolution,
Penguin Random House, 2015
Recommended references:
[3] Aristoteles: Physics, Praha, P. Rezek 1996
[4] Fragments from pre-Socratean Thinkers, Praha, NČSAV 1962.
[5] Greek Atomists. Svoboda, Praha 1980.
[6] Lucretius: De rerum natura, Praha, Svoboda 1971.
[7] Z. Horský: Kepler in Prague, Praha, Mladá fronta 1980.
[8] V. Malíšek: What do you know about the History of Physics, Praha, Horozonz 1996.
[9] R. Zajac, J. Šebesta: Historical Sources of Contemporary Physics, Bratislava, Alfa 1990..


History of Physics 202DEF2 Jex, Myška - - 2+0 z - 2
Course:History of Physics 202DEF2prof. Ing. Jex Igor DrSc.-2+0 Z-2
Abstract:Development of classical mechanics after Newton, Bernoulli's, Euler, Lagrange.
Historical development of optics, corpuscular and wave approach. Electricity and magnetism - electrostatics, galvanism, electrodynamics and electromagnetism, Faraday and Maxwell. Thermodynamics and its laws, statistical physics, Boltzmann. The birth of modern quantum and relativistic physics, Planck and Einstein. Discovery of radioaktivity, structure of atom, atomic nucleus, Rutherford and Bohr. The way to nuclear energy, Elementary particles, standard model. The concept of Nature and Universe of today.
Outline:1. The development of classical mechanics after Newton, Bernoulli, Euler, Lagrange, Laplace. 2. Historical development of optics, corpuscular and wave approach. 3. Electricity and magnetism -- electrostatics, galvanism, electrodynamics and electromagnetism, Faraday and Maxwell. 4. Thermodynamics and its laws, statistical physics, Boltzmann. 5. Scientific revolution in the 20th century, the birth of modern physics. 6. Planck and quantum hypothesis. 7. Einstein and special theory of relativity. 8. The discovery of radioactivity, atomic structure, atomic nucleus, Rutherford and Bohr. 9. The birth of quantum physics and its applications, Heisenberg, Schrödinger. 10. The discovery of uranium fission, the way to atomic energy. 11. Cosmic radiation, accelerators, elementary particles and standars model. 12. Einstein and the Univeryse, general theory of relativity. 13.The concept of Nature and Universe of today.

Outline (exercises):
Goals:Knowledge:
To be acquainted with the origin of Newtonian classical mechanics, Faraday's and Maxwellian theory of electromagnetism as well as the development of of thermodynamics and statistical physics. To understand the logical resulting of classical physics towards the relativistic, quantum and nuclear physics of 20th century and bring some considerations regarding their future development.. .

Abilities:
According to personal interests to broaden one's knowledge by further study of literature, be able to work with the historical sources and to prepare essays on the chosen thema from this period of physics..

Requirements:Knowledge and understanding the development of classical and modern physics according to the course History of Physics 1.

Key words:classical physics, modern physics
ReferencesKey references:
[1] I. Štoll: History of Physics, Praha, Prometheus 2009 (in Czech)
[2] I. Kraus: Physics in the Cultural History of Europe, Praha, ČVUT 2007, 2008, 2009 (in Czech)

Recommended references:
[3] T. Bührke: Revolutionary Discoveries in Physics, Praha, Academia 1999.
[4] L. Eckrtová: Ways of Discovering in Physics, Praha, Prometheus 2004.
[5] A. Einstein, L. Infeld: Physics as an Adventure of Mind, Praha, Orbis 1971.
[6] V. Malíšek: What do you know about the History of Physics, Praha, Horozonz 1996.
[7] R. Zajac, J. Šebesta: Historical Sources of Contemporary Physics, Bratislava, Alfa 1990..

English Conversation04AKS Kovářová, Rafajová - - 0+2 z - 1
Course:English Conversation04AKSMgr. Kovářová Jana-0+2 Z-1
Abstract:The course will develop the student´s communication skills acquired throughout their previous studies. It aims to improve all aspects of oral communication. The student will develop their vocabulary for various communication situations and will master their communication strategy. They will also practise their listening skills in order to better follow and participate in discussions. The student will be trained to express their ideas clearly and according to current English usage, and become a more confident speaker.
Outline:Training communication and comprehension skills on everyday topics, e. g. family life, jobs and professions, daily routine, culture, travelling, housing, hobbies.
Outline (exercises):The course is run as a series of seminars following the topics and scope of the syllabus mentioned above.
Goals:Knowledge:
Extended vocabulary on everyday topics; communication strategies relevant to the situation; spoken and written form of the language

Skills:
To be able to communicate in various everyday situations. To understand and join short discussions on the topics studied, to speak fluently with minimum errors in grammar and lexis.
Requirements:competence at the CEFR A2 level
Key words:Communication and listening skills, vocabulary
ReferencesKey references:
[1] J.Fictumová, J.Ceccarelli, T.Long: Angličtina, konverzace pro pokročilé, Brno 2008

Doporučená literatura:
[2] Michael McCarthy, Felicity O´Dell: Vocabulary in Use - Upper-intermediate, CUP 2017
[3] Raymond Murphy: English Grammar in Use, CUP 2015
[4] Martin Hewings: Advanced English Grammar in Use, CUP 2015


Teaching aids:
language classroom, audiovisuals, PC lab