Curricula and Syllabi of FNSPE CTU in Prague

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Aktualizace dat: 28.8.2019

česky

Master degree programmePhysics and Technology of Thermonuclear Fusion
Year 1
course code teacher ws ss ws cr. ss cr.

Compulsory courses

Plasma Theory 102TPLA12 Kulhánek 2+2 z,zk 3+1 z,zk 5 5
Course:Plasma Theory 102TPLA1prof. RNDr. Kulhánek Petr CSc.2+2 Z,ZK-5-
Abstract:The first part of the lecture will be devoted to the theoretical plasma behavior description in statistical and MHD approaches. One and two fluid models will be discussed as well as the basic set of MHD equations in curvilinear coordinates. The second part of the lecture will be devoted to the individual particles motion, especially the drift theory, and radiation of the charged particles.
Outline:1.Many particle ensembles and statistical description. Liouvill theorem, potentials, canonical and grandcanonical partition function.
2.Harmonic oscillator, vibrational a rotational spectra of the molecules - illustration of the statistical approach.
3.Non-equilibrium statistics, Boltzmann equation and its variants (Fokker-Planck, Landau, Krook and Vlasov equations).
4.Boltzmann collision term and its behavior. Momentum equation, transition to continuum.
5.Magnetohydrodynamics. Momentum and energy tensor. Conservation laws of the particles + field system: charge, energy, momentum and angular momentum. Completion of the MHD set of equations.
6.One-fluid and two-fluid models. Diffused and frozen magnetic field lines. Ideal and resistive MHD. Relativistic MHD set of equations.
7.Curvilinear coordinates. Covariant a contravariant tensors, metric tensor, Christofell symbols.
8.Equations and operators in curvilinear coordinates. Spherical and toroidal coordinates. Illustration on MHD set of equations.
9.Transport phenomena. Diffusion, heat transport, entropy flux, entropy wave. Onsager reciprocity relations.
10.Charged particles motion, Lagrange function for the charged particle in electric and magnetic fields. Relativistic and non-relativistic variants.
11.Drift theory, basic drifts, motion in the magnetic dipole. Motion of charged particles in tokamak. Adiabatic invariants.
12.Multipole series for charged particles. Monopole, dipole and quadrupole moment.
13.Charged particles radiation. Retard and advanced potentials. Radiation terms in various approach.
14.Plasma radiation. Bremsstrahlung, synchrotron radiation, recombination spectrum. Radiation scattering on free electron and dust particles. Electromagnetic collapse driven by the radiation (Pease-Braginski solution).
Outline (exercises):Calculations of examples on:
many particle ensembles and statistical description; LHO, vibrational a rotational spectra of the molecules; non-equilibrium statistics, Boltzmann equation and its variants; magnetohydrodynamics; one-fluid and two-fluid models; curvilinear coordinates; equations and operators in curvilinear coordinates; transport phenomena; charged particles motion; Lagrange function for the charged particle in electric and magnetic fields; drift theory, basic drifts; multipole series for charged particles; charged particles radiation; plasma radiation
Goals:Knowledge:
lecture will be devoted to the theoretical plasma behavior description in statistical and MHD approaches.

Skills:
application of the above mentioned knowledge
Requirements:Knowledge of basic course of physics
02TEF1,2 Theoretical physics 1,2
Key words:plasma physics
ReferencesKey references:
[1] Kulhánek P.: Theoretical physics - in czech, Kulhánek P.: Teoretická fyzika (Teoretická mechanika, Statistická fyzika, Vlny a nestability v plazmatu). Studijní texty pro PhD studenty FEL ČVUT, 2004, http://www.aldebaran.cz/studium/tf.pdf
[2] D. R. Nicholson: Introduction to Plasma Theory, John Wiley and Sons Inc, ISBN: 047109045X

Recommended references:
[3] T. J. M. Boyd, J. J. Sanderson: The Physics of Plasmas, Cambridge University Press, 2003, ISBN: 0521459125.

Course:Plasma Theory 202TPLA2prof. RNDr. Kulhánek Petr CSc.-3+1 Z,ZK-5
Abstract:Basic wave phenomena will be introduced in the first part of the lecture (dispersion relation, phase and group velocities, Fourier analysis). Fundamental plasma dispersion relations will be derived from the linearized MHD equations (magnetoacoustic waves - Alfven, F and S wave; electromagnetic waves in plasma - O, X, R, L wave, CMA diagram). The second part of the lecture will be devoted to final size waves, nonlinear phenomena (Landau damping), magnetic field arrangement, solitons in plasma, and some typical plasma configurations.
Outline:1.Basics of the wave phenomena description. Angular frequency, wave vector. Dispersion relations, linearization of the equations, Fourier transform, nonlinear waves, soliton.
2.Plasma oscillations and waves. Dispersion relation derivation. Plasma oscillations of the electrons and ions. Plasma waves. Phenomena influencing plasma waves.
3.Low frequency wave complex, magnetoacoustic waves and individual modes. Magnetoacoustic wavefront shape and direction of individual vectors.
4.High frequency wave complex. X, O, R, and L waves. Whistlers. Resonant and cutoff frequencies. Permittivity tensor of electromagnetic waves propagating through plasma.
5.Electromagnetic waves absorption in plasma. Microwave heating of the plasma.
6.MHD plasma instabilities. Bunemann, Rayleigh-Taylor, Kelvin-Helmholtz, diocotron instabilities.
7.Instabilities of current filament and individual modes, plasma behavior on free and fixed boundary. Boundary conditions. Runkine-Hugoniot shock wave jump conditions.
8.Other instabilities. Interchange instability; drift instabilities, ion acoustic instabilities.
9.Magnetic field structures. Helicity, Beltram condition, turbulence, alpha effect, MHD dynamo.
10.Magnetic reconnection. Stationary and non-stationary reconnection. Resistive tearing modes. Fan, spine and separator reconnection.
11.Nonlinear and finite amplitude phenomena. Hartman solution, Landau damping and its importance. Rules for nonlinear terms manipulation.
12.Some soliton solutions. Langmuir soliton. KdV equation, Sacharov-Kuznetsov equations, NLS equation.
13.Quasiparticles, phonons, magnons, plasmons, excitons, polarons, polaritons, bound states.
14.Some typical plasma configurations. Plasma in the magnetic dipole and in the Earth magnetic field.. Pinch. Magnetic mirrors, tokamaks, stelarators.
Outline (exercises):Calculations of examples on:
basics of the wave phenomena description; plasma oscillations and waves. Dispersion relation derivation; low frequency wave complex; high frequency wave complex; electromagnetic waves absorption in plasma; MHD plasma instabilities; instabilities of current filament and individual modes, boundary conditions; magnetic field structures; magnetic reconnection; nonlinear and finite amplitude phenomena; some soliton solutions; quasiparticles; some typical plasma configurations
Goals:Knowledge:
basic wave phenomena will be introduced in the first part of the lecture

Skills:
application of the above mentioned knowledge
Requirements:Knowledge of basic course of physics
02TEF1,2 Theoretical physics 1,2
Key words:plasma physics
ReferencesKey references:
[1] Kulhánek P.: Theoretical physics - in czech: Teoretická fyzika (Teoretická mechanika, Statistická fyzika, Vlny a nestability v plazmatu). Studijní texty pro PhD studenty FEL ČVUT, 2004, http://www.aldebaran.cz/studium/tf.pdf
[2] J. P. Freidberg: Ideal Magnetohydrodynamics, Springer, 1987, ISBN: 0306425122.

Recommended references:
[3] T. H. Stix: Waves in Plasmas Springer, 2006, ISBN: 0883188597.

Plasma Diagnostics02DPLA Kubeš - - 2+1 z,zk - 3
Course:Plasma Diagnostics02DPLAprof. RNDr. Kubeš Pavel CSc.-2+1 Z,ZK-3
Abstract:The goal of the lecture is to obtain the overview of measurements of basic parameters of hot plasma and their components - density, temperature, electromagnetic fields, radiation and energy and temporal and spatial distribution. The students will acquaint with principles, methodic, demonstration, examples and application of basic diagnostics.
Outline:1.Measurement of current and voltage (F. Žáček, IPP).
2.Detection of X-ray emission. X-ray optics, filters, detectors, X-ray and XUV spectroscopy, different types of spectroscopes. (D. Klír, FEE CTU)
3.Atomic and radiate physics (elementary processes, radiate transport) spectroscopic methods of determination of plasma parameters. Models LTE, collision-radiate, coronal and non-stationary; conditions and criteria. (D. Klír, FEE CTU).
4.X-ray spectroscopy with temporal, space and spectral resolution, PIN detectors, polychromators, pinhole cameras, MCP detectors, streak cameras, bolometry, tomography. (D. Klír, FEE CTU).
5.Pulse laser as the active diagnostics of measurement of densities and their gradients, Interferometry, schlieren and shadow methods, Thomson scattering. (P. Kubeš, FEE CTU).
6.Practical measurements. (P. Kubeš, FEE CTU).
7.Langmuir probe measurements (M. Tichý, MPF CU).
8.Microwave diagnostics, analysis of spectra by FFT (F. Žáček, IPP).
9.Beams of neutral particles as the active diagnostics, detection of neutral particles (J. Mlynář, IPP).
10.Diagnostics of plasma interaction with the wall (Horáček, IPP).
11.Detection of high-energy electrons, ions and photons with temporal, space and energy resolution. (P. Kubeš, FEE CTU).
12.Detection of fusion neutrons with temporal, space and energy distribution. (K. Řezáč, FEE CTU).
13.Time-of-flight and MC analysis of neutron signals, methods of reconstruction of signals and determination of temporal evolution of energy spectrum. (K. Řezáč, FEE CTU).
Outline (exercises):Exercising of problems:
measurement of current and voltage; detection of X-ray emission. X-ray optics, filters, detectors, X-ray and XUV spectroscopy, different types of spectroscopes; atomic and radiate physics (elementary processes, radiate transport) spectroscopic methods of determination of plasma parameters. Models LTE, collision-radiate, coronal and non-stationary; conditions and criteria; X-ray spectroscopy with temporal, space and spectral resolution, PIN detectors, polychromators, pinhole cameras, MCP detectors, streak cameras, bolometry, tomography; pulse laser as the active diagnostics of measurement of densities and their gradients, Interferometry, schlieren and shadow methods, Thomson scattering; practical measurements; Langmuir probe measurements; microwave diagnostics, analysis of spectra by FFT; beams of neutral particles as the active diagnostics, detection of neutral particles; diagnostics of plasma interaction with the wall; detection of high-energy electrons, ions and photons with temporal, space and energy resolution; detection of fusion neutrons with temporal, space and energy distribution; time-of-flight and MC analysis of neutron signals, methods of reconstruction of signals and determination of temporal evolution of energy spectrum
Goals:Knowledge:
obtaining the overview of measurements of basic parameters of hot plasma and their components

Skills:
application of the above mentioned knowledge
Requirements:Knowledge of basic course of physics
02TEF1,2 Theoretical physics 1,2
Key words:detection of X-ray emission, plasma diagnostic
ReferencesKey references:
[1] Hutchinson: Principles of Plasma Diagnostics;
[2] Griem, Lowberg: Methods of Experimental Physics, Vol.9 Plasma Physics Part A, Part B, Academic Press New York and London, 1970;

Recommended references:
[3] http://crppwww.epfl.ch/~weisen/cours_diags_agenda.html

Computer Modelling of Plasma02PMPL Plašil - - 2+1 z,zk - 3
Course:Computer Modelling of Plasma02PMPLDoc. RNDr. Plašil Radek Ph.D.-2+1 Z,ZK-3
Abstract:The goal of the lecture is to acquaint the students with basic methods of computer modelling in physics and to apply these techniques to the study of physical processes in both low-temperature and high-temperature plasmas.
Outline:1.Main directions of computational physics. Computer modelling.
2.Molecular dynamics method, principle, basic algorithms, errors.
3.Implementation of many body algorithms into the deterministic particle modelling
- PIC method, tree algorithms.
4.Monte Carlo method, principle, generation of random numbers, transformation of random numbers, application in mathematics and physics.
5.Advanced techniques in stochastical modelling.
6.Continuous and hybrid modelling in physics.
7.Modelling in plasma physics, volume processes, scattering events, electron energy distribution function.
8.Plasma-solid interaction, techniques of particle modelling in 1D, 2D and 3D.
9.Modelling in plasma chemistry.
10.Particle modelling in plasma in the presence of external magnetic field.
11.Particle modelling in high-temperature plasma. Probe diagnostics in edge plasma.
12.Fluid modelling of plasma.
13.Basic techniques of hybrid modelling of plasma.
Outline (exercises):Calculations of examples on:
molecular dynamics method, principle, basic algorithms, errors; implementation of many body algorithms into the deterministic particle modelling
- PIC method, tree algorithms; Monte Carlo method, principle, generation of random numbers, transformation of random numbers, application in mathematics and physics.
5.Advanced techniques in stochastical modelling; continuous and hybrid modelling in physics; modelling in plasma physics, volume processes, scattering events, electron energy distribution function; plasma-solid interaction, techniques of particle modelling in 1D, 2D and 3D; modelling in plasma chemistry; particle modelling in plasma in the presence of external magnetic field; particle modelling in high-temperature plasma. Probe diagnostics in edge plasma; fluid modelling of plasma; basic techniques of hybrid modelling of plasma.
Goals:Knowledge:
basic methods of computer modelling in physics

Skills:
application of these techniques to the study of physical processes in both low-temperature and high-temperature plasmas
Requirements:Knowledge of basic course of physics
Key words:plasma, computer modelling
ReferencesKey references:
[1] R. Hrach: Computr physics I - in czech: R. Hrach: Počítačová fyzika I, skripta, PF UJEP, Ústí nad Labem 2003.
[2] C.K. Birdsall, A.B. Langdon: Plasma physics via computer simulation, Taylor and Francis, New York 1991.
[3] R.W. Hockney, J.W. Eastwood: Computer simulation using particles, Taylor and Francis, New York 1988.
[4] T. Tajima: Computation plasma physics - With applications to fusion and astrophysics,Westview Press, Cambridge 2004.

Recommended references:
[5] F.F. Chen: Introduction to plasma physics and controlled fusion, Springer, New York 2006.

Technology of Thermonuclear Facilities02TTJZ Ďuran, Entler - - 3+0 zk - 3
Course:Technology of Thermonuclear Facilities02TTJZIng. Entler Slavomír Ph.D.-3+0 ZK-3
Abstract:The course introduces students to the basic problems associated with technical realization of controlled thermonuclear fusion. The aim is to provide students with a starting point for their direct research
involvement in development of one of the systems critical for operation of fusion devices. Further, in particular for those students with more emphasis on plasma theory, the course provides a good overview of
technical problems, possibilities, and limits associated with operation of fusion devices as these technical limits form boundary conditions for any applicable fusion theory research.
Outline:1.Introduction to the tokamak engineering I
2.Introduction to the tokamak engineering II
3.Physics and technology of intensive magnetic fields
4.Cryogenics and its application in fusion reactors
5.Additional heating of magnetically confined plasma - high frequency electromagnetic sources
6.Additional heating of magnetically confined plasma - neutral beam injection sources
7.Computer control of complex experiments, data acquisition
8.Real-time control of different plasma parameters
9.Technological aspects of inertial fusion I
10.Technological aspects of inertial fusion II
11.Radiation damage of materials for fusion reactor
12.Introduction to the radiation safety
13.Tritium handling and fuel cycle of fusion reactors

Outline (exercises):
Goals:Knowledge:
students introduce to the basic problems associated with technical realization of controlled thermonuclear fusion.

Skills:
application of the above mentioned knowledge in development of one of the systems critical for operation of fusion devices
Requirements:Knowledge of basic course of physics
Key words:tokamak, magnetic field, cryogenics, plasma, inertial fusion
ReferencesKey references:
[1] Proceedings of Carolus Magnus Summer School on Plasma and Fusion Energy Physics, Bad Honnef, Germany, September 2007. Trans. Fus. Sci. Technol 53 (2008) 2T, online http://www.carolusmagnus.net/papers/2007/papers_2007.html

Recommended references:
[2] Garry McCracken and Peter Stott: Fusion, The Energy of the Universe, Academic Press February 2005 ISBN 012481851X ; v českém překladu pod názvem Fúze - energie vesmíru, Mladá Fronta, edice Kolumbus, 2006, ISBN 80-204-1453-3
[3] J.P. Freidberg: Plasma Physics and Fusion Energy, Cambridge University Press 2007, ISBN 0521851076

Inertial Fusion Physics12FIF Klimo, Limpouch 3+1 z,zk - - 4 -
Course:Inertial Fusion Physics12FIFdoc. Ing. Klimo Ondřej Ph.D. / prof. Ing. Limpouch Jiří CSc.3+1 Z,ZK-4-
Abstract:These lectures aim to introduce to the topic of inertial confinement fusion (ICF). Physical processes, which take place during the individual stages before and after ignition of the fuel are discussed. The problems (instabilities etc.), which make the inertial confinement and the ignition of the fuel more demanding are discussed and their potential solutions are presented. New projects in the field of ICF including some preliminary reactor designes are reviewed.
Outline:1) Earth energy balance, energy production methods, greenhouse effect, nuclear fusion
2) Options for fusion initialization, muon catalysis versus high temperature, Lawson criterion
3) Principle of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF), energy gain, necessity of fuel compression, directly driven and indirectly driven ICF, inertial confinement fusion for energy production (IFE)
4) Shell target, aspect ratio, ablative shell acceleration, shock wave, spherical cumulation
5) Hydrodynamic instabilities, laser imprint
6) Laser interaction, laser beam propagation in corona, laser beam homogenization, laser absorption, parametric instabilities, stimulated Brillouin and Raman scattering
7) Energy transport in target, electron heat flux, radiation transport
8) Fusion spark, fusion burn wave, induced magnetic fields, particle kinetics
9) Fast ignition of ICF, subpicosecond laser interactions with targets
10) Target manufacturing for ICF, special target layers, cryogenic targets
11) Interaction of intense ion beams with targets
12) Concepts of energy reactors for IFE, tritium production, first wall protection
13) Advantages and drawbacks of energy drivers for IFE
14) High energy density physics, strongly coupled plasma, Equation-of-State at extreme pressures, laboratory astrophysics
15) Other laser-plasma applications - X-ray laser and sources, electron and ion acceleration
Outline (exercises):1) Energy balance in the compressed shell target
2) Energy gain from the target
3) Strong and weak shock waves and comparison with adiabatic compression
4) Rayleigh-Taylor instability
5) Laser-plasma instabilities
6) Abaltion and energy transport
Goals:Knowledge:
Students should gain basic knowledge about the physical processes, which take place during the individual stages before and after ignition of the fuel, the problems, which make the inertial confinement and the ignition of the fuel more demanding and their potential solutions.

Skills:
Understanding the basic processes taking part in the inertial confinement fusion and become familiar with the new findings and approaches in this topic.
Requirements:Knowledge of basic course of physics
02TEF1,2 Theoretical physics 1,2
Key words:Inertial confinement fusion, hydrodynamic instabilities, laser plasma instabilities, ablation, thermonuclear fusion, shock waves.
ReferencesKey references:
[1] S. Atzeni, J. Meyer-ter-Vehn, The Physics of Inertial Fusion: Beam Plasma Interaction, Hydrodynamics, Hot Dense Matter, Oxford Univ. Press, Oxforf 2004

Recommended references:
[2] S. Eliezer, The Interaction of High/Power Lasers with Plasmas, Institute of Physics Publishing, Bristol 2002
[3] K. Niu, Nuclear Fusion. Cambridge Univ. Press, Cambridge, UK, 1989.
[4] C. Yamanaka, Introduction to Laser Fusion, Harwood Academic, London 1991
[5] Laser Plasma Interactions 5: Inertial Confinement Fusion, edited by M.B. Hooper. SUSSP Publications, Edinburgh, 1995, pp. 105-137.
[6] W.L. Kruer, The Physics of Laser-Plasma Interactions. Addison-Wesley, New York, 1988.

Physics of Tokamaks02FT Mlynář 3+1 z,zk - - 4 -
Course:Physics of Tokamaks02FTdoc. RNDr. Mlynář Jan Ph.D.3+1 Z,ZK-4-
Abstract:Students will be introduced in detail to physics of tokamak experiments. The course will be focused on the physics context, terminology and phenomenology of the subject so that the participants can substantially improve their capacity to search for information and to work independently with scientific literature.
Outline:1)Purpose and contents of the course. Magnetic fields in tokamaks.
2)Plasma equilibrium in tokamaks: Grad-Shafranov equation
3)Plasma equilibrium in tokamaks: Solutions and interpretation
4)Electric fields and electric current in tokamaks
5)Plasma radiation
6)Transport in tokamaks I : Neoclassical diffusion
7)Transport in tokamaks II: Empirical approach
8)Plasma heating and fuelling
9)Physics of the plasma edge
10)Plasma-wall interaction
11)Tokamak instabilities I
12)Tokamak Instabilities II.
13)Plasma stability, operational diagrams, ITER
Outline (exercises):Calculations of examples on:
1)Purpose and contents of the course. Magnetic fields in tokamaks. Plasma equilibrium in tokamaks: Grad-Shafranov equation
2)Plasma equilibrium in tokamaks: Solutions and interpretation. Electric fields and electric current in tokamaks
3)Plasma radiation, Transport in tokamaks I : Neoclassical diffusion
4)Transport in tokamaks II: Empirical approach, Plasma heating and fuelling
5)Physics of the plasma edge. Plasma-wall interaction
6)Tokamak instabilities.
7)Plasma stability, operational diagrams, ITER
Goals:Knowledge:
introducing in detail to physics of tokamak experiments

Skills:
the course will be focused on the physics context, terminology and phenomenology of the subject so that the participants can substantially improve their capacity to search for information and to work independently with scientific literature.
Requirements:Knowledge of basic course of physics
02TEF1,2 Theoretical physics 1,2
Key words:thermonuclear fusion, plasma, tokamak, equilibrium, confinement, heating, transport barriers, plasma edge, stability, instabilities, tritium
ReferencesKey references:
[1] J Wesson, Tokamaks, Clarendon Press 2004, chapters 11-13, ISBN 0198509227.
[2] J.P. Freidberg: Ideal Magnetohydrodynamics, Plenum Press, 1987, . C. Stangeby: The Plasma Boundary of Magnetic Fusion Devices, IOP Press, 2000

Recommended references:
[3] ITER Physics Basis, http://web.gat.com/iter-ga/iter_physics.html

Atomic and Molecular Physics02AMF Břeň 2+2 z,zk - - 4 -
Course:Atomic and Molecular Physics02AMFRNDr. Břeň David Ph.D.2+2 Z,ZK-4-
Abstract:This lecture course provides a theoretical introduction to atomic and molecular physics.
Outline:1.Radiative transitions
2.Hydrogen atom and alkali-metal atoms
3.Helium atom
4.Vector model of atom
5.Hund's rules
6.General molecular Hamiltonian and Born-Oppenheimer approximation
7.Molecular symmetry
8.H2+
9.H2
10.Diatomic molecules
11.Polyatomic molecules
12.Interactions with radiation
Outline (exercises):Calculations of examples on:
1.Radiative transitions
2.Hydrogen atom and alkali-metal atoms
3.Helium atom
4.Vector model of atom
5.Hund's rules
6.General molecular Hamiltonian and Born-Oppenheimer approximation
7.Molecular symmetry
8.H2+
9.H2
10.Diatomic molecules
11.Polyatomic molecules
12.Interactions with radiation
Goals:Knowledge: to learn the basic of atomic and molecular physics, to solve simple QM equation.

Skills: application on the solution of examples
Requirements:Knowledge of basic course of physics
02TEF1,2 Theoretical physics 1,2
Key words:isolated atom Hamiltonian; isolated molecule Hamiltonian; Schrödinger equation; Born-Oppenheimer approximation; electron orbital; rotation and vibration of molekules
ReferencesKey references:
[1] S.Erkoç and T. Uzer, Atomic and molecular physics, World Scientific, 1996

Recommended references:
[2] H. Haken and H. Ch. Wolf, Molecular physics and elements of quantum chemistry, Springer 2003.

Materials Science for Reactors14NMR Čech, Haušild - - 2+0 zk - 2
Course:Materials Science for Reactors14NMRprof. Dr. Ing. Haušild Petr----
Abstract:Materials for classical and fusion reactors
Outline:1. Radiation damage, effects of radiation on materials; interaction of radiation with crystal lattice, influence of irradiation temperature; mechanical properties irradiated materials.
2. Material conception of nuclear reactors primary demand on materials and welds of pressure vessel; summary of used materials; degradation mechanisms; short - term plus long - term characteristics; specificity of materials and construction of reactor VVER and PWR type; surveillance program of irradiated specimens; neutron dosimetry for surveillance program; verification of irradiation temperature ; non - destructive testing.
3. Zr alloys: production, types, using, PWR, VVER; characteristics of Zr-coating in normal service conditions (rust, hydrogen absorption), abnormal service conditions (boiling, short - term overheating) and accidents (RIA, LOCA); above - project accident pair with melting core.
4. Nuclear fusion: interaction of plasma with materials, transitional matters; demand on materials for inner component; specific materials for inner component; first wall, envelope, cooling system; wolfram, beryllium carbon composites; joining materials; plasma spraying (principle, using); specific materials for others application; vacuum vessel; sperconductive coils; materials for electric insulation; special materials under development.
Outline (exercises):Metallography
Tensile test
Goals:Knowledge: Material conception of classical and fusion nuclear reactors
Skills: Orientation in nuclear material topics
Requirements:14NMA
Key words:Interaction of radiation with crystal lattice, Radiation damage, Materials for nuclear pressure vessels, Zr alloys, Interaction of plasma with materials, Materials for nuclear fusion.
ReferencesKey references:
[1] G.S. Was, Fundamentals of Radiation Materials Science Metals and Alloys, Springer-Verlag 2007.
Recommended references:
[1] J. Koutsky and J. Kocik , Radiation Damage of Structural Materials. Material Science Monographs 79, Elsevier 1994.

Laboratory Work in Plasma Physics 102PRPL12 Svoboda 0+2 z 0+2 kz 2 2
Course:Laboratory Work in Plasma Physics 102PRPL1Ing. Svoboda Vojtěch CSc.0+2 Z-2-
Abstract:The main aim of the course Laboratory Work in Plasma Physics is to get students acquainted with several complex experimental devices (tokamaks
GOLEM and COMPASS, large laser facility PALS, experimental fission reactor VR-1 VRABEC and others). Besides that, students obtain and
strengthen basic skills critical to their potential future experimental research carrier e.g. preparation of experiment, its execution, analysis and interpretation of measured data, and presentation of results.
Outline:
Outline (exercises):1. Thermal plasma, its generation, diagnostics and applications.
2. Electron microscopy and its application for study of material degradation.
3. Measurement of hard X ray and neutron emission from impulse DD fusion neutron source with temporal resolution on Z-pinch device.
4. Measurement of basic parameters of plasma in GOLEM tokamak
5. Measurement of spectra in visible and UV range on COMPASS tokamak.
6. Measurement of magnetic fields on COMPASS tokamak.
7. Fast measurements (PALS).
8. Measurement of glow discharge parameters by Langmuir probes.
9. Introduction into neutron measurements (VR-1 VRABEC).
Goals:Knowledge:
The main aim of the course Laboratory Work in Plasma Physics is to get students acquainted with several complex experimental devices (tokamaks GOLEM and COMPASS, large laser facility PALS, experimental fission reactor VR-1 VRABEC and others).

Skills:
students obtain and strengthen basic skills critical to their potential future experimental research carrier e.g. preparation of experiment, its execution, analysis and interpretation of measured data, and presentation of results.
Requirements:Knowledge of basic course of physics
Key words:Laboratory exercises, plasma physics, diagnostics

ReferencesKey references:
[1] J Wesson, Tokamaks, Clarendon Press 2004, chapters 11-13, ISBN 0198509227.

Recommended references:
[2] ITER Physics Basis, http://web.gat.com/iter-ga/iter_physics.html

Course:Laboratory Work in Plasma Physics 202PRPL2Ing. Svoboda Vojtěch CSc.-0+2 KZ-2
Abstract:The main aim of the course Laboratory Work in Plasma Physics is to get students acquainted with several complex experimental devices (tokamaks
GOLEM and COMPASS, large laser facility PALS, experimental fission reactor VR-1 VRABEC and others). Besides that, students obtain and
strengthen basic skills critical to their potential future experimental research carrier e.g. preparation of experiment, its execution, analysis and interpretation of measured data, and presentation of results.
Outline:
Outline (exercises):1. Thermal plasma, its generation, diagnostics and applications.
2. Electron microscopy and its application for study of material degradation.
3. Measurement of hard X ray and neutron emission from impulse DD fusion neutron source with temporal resolution on Z-pinch device.
4. Measurement of basic parameters of plasma in GOLEM tokamak
5. Measurement of spectra in visible and UV range on COMPASS tokamak.
6. Measurement of magnetic fields on COMPASS tokamak.
7. Fast measurements (PALS).
8. Measurement of glow discharge parameters by Langmuir probes.
9. Introduction into neutron measurements (VR-1 VRABEC).
Goals:Knowledge:
The main aim of the course Laboratory Work in Plasma Physics is to get students acquainted with several complex experimental devices (tokamaks GOLEM and COMPASS, large laser facility PALS, experimental fission reactor VR-1 VRABEC and others).

Skills:
students obtain and strengthen basic skills critical to their potential future experimental research carrier e.g. preparation of experiment, its execution, analysis and interpretation of measured data, and presentation of results.
Requirements:Knowledge of basic course of physics
Key words:plasma physics, nuclear fusion, Laboratory exercises, diagnostics

ReferencesKey references:
[1] J Wesson, Tokamaks, Clarendon Press 2004, chapters 11-13, ISBN 0198509227.

Recommended references:
[2] ITER Physics Basis, http://web.gat.com/iter-ga/iter_physics.html

Research Project 102VUTF12 Svoboda 0+6 z 0+8 kz 6 8
Course:Research Project 102VUTF1Ing. Svoboda Vojtěch CSc.----
Abstract:Research project on selected topic under supervisors guidance.
Outline:Research project on selected topic under supervisors guidance.
Outline (exercises):
Goals:Knowledge:
a particular field depending on a given project topic.

Skills:
working unaided on a given task, understanding the problem, producing an original specialist text.
Requirements:
Key words:
ReferencesReferences are done according to the subject.

Course:Research Project 202VUTF2Ing. Svoboda Vojtěch CSc.----
Abstract:Research project on selected topic under supervisors guidance.
Outline:Research project on selected topic under supervisors guidance.
Outline (exercises):
Goals:Knowledge:
a particular field depending on a given project topic.

Skills:
working unaided on a given task, understanding the problem, producing an original specialist text.
Requirements:
Key words:
ReferencesReferences are done according to the subject.

Optional courses

Topics in Magnetic Confinement Fusion02PMCF Mlynář - - 0+2 kz - 2
Course:Topics in Magnetic Confinement Fusion02PMCFdoc. RNDr. Mlynář Jan Ph.D.-0+2 KZ-2
Abstract:This course provides an opportunity to students interested in magnetic confinement fusion to enhance their knowledge of fusion physics and technology by special topics that are not covered by the mainstream courses. At the same time, it is a platform where students can meet young research scientists from the COMPASS tokamak. In the end of the course students are expected to present results of their own research task.
Outline:1)Stellarator physics
2)Simulation of fusion plasmas and integrated tokamak modelling
3)Flux simulation in the plasma edge
4)Current topics in the plasma edge physics
5)Revesed field pinch; Tokamaks of the Ignitor type
6)Tired eyes of the radiation detectors
7)Thomson scattering on the tokamak COMPASS
8)Magnetic field modelling for the tokamak COMPASS
9)Magnetic field control on the tokamak COMPASS
10)Inversed tasks in the data analysis (tomography, spectral unfolding)
11)Presentation of research projects
12)Presentation of research projects
13)Presentation of research projects
Outline (exercises):
Goals:Knowledge:
this course provides an opportunity to students interested in magnetic confinement fusion to enhance their knowledge of fusion physics and technology by special topics that are not covered by the mainstream courses.

Skills:
application of the above mentioned knowledge
Requirements:Knowledge of basic course of physics
02TEF1,2 Theoretical physics 1,2
Key words:magnetic confinement fusion, tokamak
ReferencesKey references:
[1] K Miyamoto, Controlled fusion and plasma physics, Taylor and Francis 2007, ISBN 1-58488-709-5
[2] Proceedings of IPP Summer University for Plasma Physics / Carolus Magnus Summer School (both on http://www.jet.efda.org/pages/publications/books.html)

Recommended references:
[3] J Wesson, Tokamaks, Clarendon Press 2004, chapters 11-13, ISBN 0198509227

Inertial Confinement Fusion12PICF Klír, Limpouch - - 2+0 kz - 2
Course:Inertial Confinement Fusion12PICFprof. Ing. Klír Daniel Ph.D. / prof. Ing. Limpouch Jiří CSc.-2 KZ-2
Abstract:Main lecture goal is to acquaint students with certain detailed theoretical and experimental methods that have not been taught in subject FIF (Physics of Inertial Fusion).
Outline:1) Theory of the interaction of laser beams with plasma corona
2) Nonlinear processes, generation of hot electrons, improvement of hydro efficiency
3) Interaction of heavy ions beams with targets, deceleration of heavy ions in dense plasma
4) Targets for ion-driven fusion, possibilities of increasing of homogeneity of target irradiation
5) Physics of Rayleigh-Taylor, Richmeyer-Meshkov and Kelvin-Helmholzov instability
6) Shock a impact ignition
7) Fuel burn in different regimes of inertial fusion (ICF)
8) Optical diagnostic methods in ICF
9) X-ray diagnostic methods in ICF
10) Electron and ion diagnostic methods in ICF
11) Neutron diagnostics in ICF
12) IFE reactors (IFE - Inertial Fusion for Energy production)
13) Hybrid fusion-fission reactors and radioactive waste disposal
Outline (exercises):
Goals:Knowledge: Main lecture goal is to acquaint students with certain detailed theoretical and experimental methods that have not been taught in subject FIF (Physics of Inertial Fusion).

Skills: application of the above mentioned knowledge
Requirements:Knowledge at the level of the basic course of physics
Key words:plasma
ReferencesKey references:
[1] S. Eliezer, The Interaction of High/Power Lasers with Plasmas, Institute of Physics Publishing, Bristol 2002
[2] K. Niu, Nuclear Fusion. Cambridge Univ. Press, Cambridge, UK, 1989.
[3] C. Yamanaka, Introduction to Laser Fusion, Harwood Academic, London 1991
[4] S. Atzeni, J. Meyer-ter-Vehn, The Physics of Inertial Fusion: Beam Plasma Interaction, Hydrodynamics, Hot Dense Matter, Oxford Univ. Press, Oxforf 2004
[5] Laser Plasma Interactions 5: Inertial Confinement Fusion, edited by M.B. Hooper. SUSSP Publications, Edinburgh, 1995, pp. 105-137.
[6] Handbook of Plasma Physics,vol. 3 Physics of Laser Plasma, ed. S. Witkowski, North Holland Publishing, Amsterdam 1991

Recommended references:
[7] W.L. Kruer, The Physics of Laser-Plasma Interactions. Addison-Wesley, New York, 1988.

Superconductivity and Low Temperature11SUPR Janů, Ledinský 4+0 zk - - 4 -
Course:Superconductivity and Low Temperature11SUPRRNDr. Janů Zdeněk CSc. / Mgr. Ledinský Martin4 ZK-4-
Abstract:The subject of course is: low temperature physics, including cooling methods, low temperature technique, and measurement of low temperatures; macroscopic quantum phenomena in quantum fluids (superfluidity and superconductivity), quantum crystals and diffusion, mesoscopic phenomena in electron systems, quantum Hall effects, Coulomb blockade and single electron transistor.
Outline:1. Introduction to low temperature physics. ^^2. Cooling methods. ^^3. Low temperature technique and measurement of low temperatures. ^^4. Superfluidity. ^^5. Quantum crystals and diffusion. ^^6. Quantum Hall effect. ^^7. Coulomb blockade and single electron transistor. ^^8. Phenomenology of superconductivity. ^^9. Ginzburg Landau theory. ^^10. Type I and II superconductors. ^^11. Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory. ^^12. Josephson phenomena and SQUIDs. ^^13. High temperature superconductivity. ^^14. Applications of superconductivity.
Outline (exercises):
Goals:Knowledge:^^Knowledge of superconductivity and low temperature physics. ^^Skills:^^Orientation in questions of behavior the liquids and solid state in low temperatures.
Requirements:
Key words:Quantum Hall effect, Coulomb blockade, superconductivity, superfluidity
ReferencesKey references:^^[1]. Tilley D.R., Superfluidity and Superconductivity, Van Nostrand Reinhold Company Ltd., London, 1974. ^^Recomended references:^^[2]. Supriyo Datta: Electronic transport in mesoscopic systems, Cambridge University Press, 1995.

Low Temperature Plasmas and Discharges12NIPL Král 4+0 z,zk - - 4 -
Course:Low Temperature Plasmas and Discharges12NIPLprof. Ing. Král Jaroslav CSc.4 Z,ZK-4-
Abstract:Atomic collision phenomena; basic concepts and relations; elastic scattering; ionization and excitation; three-particle recombination. Brehmsstrahlung; radiative capture; line radiation. Processes in partially ionized gas. Gas in thermodynamic equilibrium. Ionized gas in electric field. Phenomena on electrodes.
Breakdown of gas in D.C. and A.C. electric fields. Gas discharges; V-A charakteristics. Glow discharge. Self-sustaining D.C. arc discharge. Low pressure discharge with heated cathode. Electrical probes.
Outline:- Atomic collision phenomena.
- Electromagnetic radiation of system of charges.
- Processes in gas with particle collisions.
- Gas in thermodynamic equilibrium.
- Ionized gas in electric field.
- Phenomena on surface of electrodes.
- Breakdown of gas in DC electric field.
- Breakdown of gas in AC field.
- Glow discharge.
- Self-sustained arc discharge.
- Low pressure arc with heated cathode.
- Electrical (Langmuir) probes for plasma diagnostics.
Outline (exercises):
Goals:Knowledge of processes in partially ionized gas.
Ability to understand behaviour of various discharges.
Requirements:Basics of atom physics, theory of electomagnetic field.
Key words:Plasmas - collision phenomena - gas discharge - electrical breakdown.
ReferencesObligatory
[1]- J. Král: Low temperature plasmas and discharges. Lectures in electronic form.
Optional
[2]- E.W. McDaniel: Collision Phenomena in Ionized Gases. J.Wiley & Sons, New York, 1964.
[3]- M. Mitchner, C.H. Kruger,Jr: Partially Ionized Gases. J. Wiley & Sons, New York , 1973.
[4]- A.M. Howatson: An Introduction to Gas Discharges. 2nd. edition, Pergamon Press, Oxford, 1976.
[5]- Ju.P. Rajzer: Fizika gazovovo razrjada. Nauka, Moskva, 1987. in Russion.
[6]- V.L. Granovskij: Električeskij tok v gaze, ustanovivšijsa tok. Nauka, Moskva, 1971.
[7]- J.D. Swift, M.J.R. Schwar: Electrical Probes for Plasma Diagnostics, Iliffe Books, London, 1970.

Differential Equations on Computer12DRP Liska 2+2 z,zk - - 5 -
Course:Differential Equations on Computer12DRPprof. Ing. Liska Richard CSc.2+2 Z,ZK-5-
Abstract:Ordinary differential equations, analytical methods; Ordinary differential equations, numerical methods, Runge-Kutta methods, stability; Partial differential equations, analysis, hyperbolik, parabolic and elliptic equations, posedness of differential equaitons; Partial differential equations, numerical solution, finite difference
methods, difference schemes, order of approximation, stability, convergence, modified equation, diffusion, dispersion; Conservation laws and their numerical solution, shallow water equations, Euler equations, Lagrangian methods, ALE methods; Practical computation in
Matlab system for numerics and Maple for analysis of schemes.
Outline:1. Ordinary differential equations, analytical methods, stability.
2. Ordinary differential equations, Runge-Kutta methods, stability function, stability domain, order of method.
3. Ordinary differential equations with boundary conditions.
4. Hyperbolic partial differential equations, characteristics, boundary conditions, finite difference methods
5. Convergence, consistency, well-posedness, stability, Lax-Richtmyer theorem, Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy (CFL) condition.
6. Fourier analysis of well-posedness and stability, von Neumann stability condition.
7. Lax-Wendroff scheme, implicit schemes, order of approximation, modified equation, diffusion, dispersion.
8. Parabolic equations, difference schemes for parabolic equations.
9. Elliptic equations, iterative methods for solving systems of linear equations.
10. Advection equation in 2D, dimensional spliting, difference schemes.
11. Conservation laws, integral form, Rankin-Hugoniot condition.
12. Burgers equation, shallow water equations, Euler equations, shock wave. rarefaction wave, contact discontinuity, difference schemes.
13. Lagrangian methods for Euler equations, mass coordinates.
14. ALE (Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian) method, mesh smoothing, remapping.
Outline (exercises):1. Ordinary differential equations, analytical methods, stability.
2. Ordinary differential equations, design of Runge-Kutta (RK) methods.
3. Computing stability function and domain of RK method, order of RK method.
4. Finite difference schemes for advection equation, numerical verification of their properties - stability and order of approximation.
5. Analytical determination of order of approximation of difference scheme.
6. Analytical determination of stability condition by Fourier method.
7. Analytical-numerical determination of stability condition by Fourier method.
8. Computing modified equation of difference scheme.
9. Difference schemes for parabolic equation - heat equation.
10. Difference schemes for advection diffusion equation.
11. Difference schemes for elliptic Poisson equation.
12. Test - design and analysis of finite difference scheme.
13. Difference schemes for Burgers equation, shallow water equation and Euler equations.
14. Lagrangian difference schemes, ALE method.
Goals:Knowledge:
Knowledge of numerical solution of differential equations.

Skills:
Ability to design and analyze numerical methods for solution of differential equations.
Requirements:
Key words:Ordinary differential equations, Runge-Kutta methods, partial differential equations, finite difference schemes, conservation laws.
ReferencesKey references:
[1] J.C. Strikwerda: Finite Difference Schemes and Partial Differential Equations, Chapman and Hall, New York, 1989.

Recommended references:
[2] R.J. LeVeque: Numerical Methods for Conservation Laws, Birkhauser Verlag, Basel, 1990.

Study aids:
Computer classroom Unix with integrated mathematical systems Matlab and Maple.
http://www-troja.fjfi.cvut.cz/~liska/drp

Computer Control of Experiments12POEX Čech - - 2+0 z - 2
Course:Computer Control of Experiments12POEXdoc. Ing. Čech Miroslav CSc.-2+0 Z-2
Abstract:Introduction. Basic design of computers, microcomputers. Hardware: computer-experiment interconnection ( interfaces RS232C,IEE488, A/D and D/A converters, sensors, drivers, etc.) Software: operating systems for control of experiments ( real time OS, multitasking, multiuser). Basic theory of control systems. Programming languages for control (assembler, C, etc.) Introduction to TCP/IP protocols. Control of experiments via Internet.
Outline:1.Introduction to digital electronics
2.Principle of computers
3.Principle of sensors
4.A/D and D/A converters
5.Computer interfaces, serial, parallel, USB
6.IEEE-488 interface
7.Software
8.Real time operating systems
9.Programming language
10.Introduction to theory of control systems
11.Introduction to computer network, TCP/IP protocols
12.Practical training
Outline (exercises):None
Goals:Knowledge: Structure and principles of computer control of experiments
Skills: to design a realize measurement and control system.
Requirements:Basic knowledge in digital electronics.
Key words:Sensor, interface, DA AD convertor, control systém, programming
ReferencesKey references:
1.H. Häberle: Industrial Electronics and Information Technology, Europa-Sobotáles cz., Praha 2003 (in Czech)
2.J. Balátě a kol.: Technical Resources of Automatic Control, SNTL Praha, 1986 (in Czech)
3.F. Dlabola, J. Starý: Microprocessor Systems a data transfer, NDS Praha 1986 (in Czech)
4.J. Bayer, J. Bílek: Control Systems Design, Skripta ČVUT, 1987 (in Czech)
5.V. Haasz, J. Roztočil, J. Novák: Digital Measurement Systems, Skripta ČVUT, 2000 (in Czech)
6.M. Šnorek: Standard Interfaces of PC, Grada, Praha 1992 (in Czech)
7.J. Pavel, J. Resl: Electrotechnic I, Vydavatelství ČVUT, Praha 1997 (in Czech)
8.J. Pavel, J. Resl: Electrotechnic II, Vydavatelství ČVUT, Praha 1998 (in Czech)
9.B. Kainka: USB - Measurement, Control and Regulation by the USB, Ben, Praha 2002 (in Czech)
10.J. Peterka: Computer Network 3.0., www.earchiv.cz, 2004 (in Czech)

Recommended references:
1.1. IEEE Std. 481.1-2003 , IEEE Standard for Higher Performance Protocol for Standard Digital Interface for Programmable Instrumentation, IEEE New York, 2003
2.W. Kester: Analog-Digital Conversion, Analog Devices, 2004


Neutron Physics02NF Šaroun, Vacík - - 2+2 z,zk - 4
Course:Neutron Physics02NFVacík Jiří CSc.-2+2 Z,ZK-4
Abstract:Basic properties of neutron, radionuclide neutron sources, accelerator based neutron sources, nuclear research reactors, neutron induced reactions, fission, neutron detection, neutron diffraction, neutron interaction with matter, slowing down and absorption of neutrons, macroscopic description of neutron transport, neutron shielding, physical principles of nuclear facilities for energy production.
Outline:1.radionuclide neutron sources
2.accelerator based neutron sources, nuclear research reactors
3.neutron induced reactions, fission
4.neutron detection
5.neutron interaction with matter
6.slowing down and absorption of neutrons
7.macroscopic description of neutron transport
8.basic properties of neutron
9.neutron diffraction
10.neutron shielding and dosimetry
11.physical principles of nuclear facilities for energy production
12.exam
Outline (exercises):Calculations of examples on:
1.radionuclide neutron sources
2.accelerator based neutron sources, nuclear research reactors
3.neutron induced reactions, fission
4.neutron detection
5.neutron interaction with matter
6.slowing down and absorption of neutrons
7.macroscopic description of neutron transport
8.basic properties of neutron
9.neutron diffraction
10.neutron shielding and dosimetry
11.physical principles of nuclear facilities for energy production
Goals:Knowledge:
Basic knowledge in neutron physics, its methods and applications

Skills:
Ability to calculate problems in neutron physics
Requirements:Knowledge of the subjects subatomic physics, Interaction of radiation with matter, Radiation Detectors.
Key words:Neutron physics, radiation sources, radiation detectors, transport theory, accelerator, nuclear reactor, neutron shielding, neutron moderation, nuclear reactions, fission.
ReferencesKey references:
[1] K.-H. Beckurts, K. Wirtz, Neutron Physics, Springer, 1974
[2] K. Krane, Introductory Nuclear Physics, J. Wiley, 1988
[3] S. Cierjacks, Neutron Sources for Basic Physics Applications, Pergamon Press, 1983

Recommended references:
[4] R. E. Chrien, Neutron Radiative Capture, Pergamon Press 1984
[5] G. F. Knoll, Radiation Detection and Measurement, J. Wiley, 2000

Optical Spectroscopy12OPS Michl - - 2+0 zk - 2
Course:Optical Spectroscopy12OPSRNDr. Michl Martin Ph.D.-2+0 ZK-2
Abstract:Basics of spectroscopic behaviour of atoms and molecules. Elementary experimental techniques for optical spectroscopy.
Outline:1. Energetic levels in atoms and molecules
2. Interaction with electromagnetic radiation; Tranition probabilities; Selection rules
3. Basic spectroscopic and photometric quantities; Shape of spectral lines; Homogeneous and inhomogeneous broadening
4. Basic spectroscopic instrumentation (sources of radiation, detectors, optical materials)
5. Dispersion spectrometers vs. interferometric instruments; Single-channel vs. multichannel detection
6. Atomic absorption and emission spectroscopy (flame and ICP AAS, ICP OES)
7. UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy;
Colour of matter
8. Luminiscence spectroscopy; Luminiscence decay; Non-radiative relaxation processes
9.Infrared absorption spectroscopy; Raman scattering spectroscopy
10. Polarized light in spectroscopy; Linear dichroism; Fluorescence anisotropy; Depolarization of Raman scattering
11. Chirality and optical activity; Optical rotatoty dispersion; Circular dichroism; Raman optical activity
12. Laboratory excursion I
13. Laboratory excursion II
Outline (exercises):
Goals:Students will become acquainted with theoretical elements and experimental techniques of spectroscopic investigation of atoms and molecules in optical spectral region.
Requirements:Previous attending of the 12MOF course is recommended.
Key words:Optical spectroscopy, energetic levels, interaction of light with matter, spectroscopic instrumentation
ReferencesRecommended reading:

1. V. Prosser: Experimental methods of biophysics (in czech), Academia Praha, 1989

2. N. V. Tkachenko: Optical spectroscopy: methods and instrumentation, Elsevier Amsterdam, 2006

Nuclear Technology Devices16ZJT Augsten, Čechák 2+0 zk - - 2 -
Course:Nuclear Technology Devices16ZJTprof. Ing. Čechák Tomáš CSc.----
Abstract:Basic scheme of nuclear reactor and nuclear power plant, chain fission reaction development, factors influencing reactivity, internal fuel cycle, main components of nuclear energetic reactor, most important reactor types, linear high-voltage accelerators, linear high-frequency accelerators, accelerators based on cyclotron, microtron, betatron, electron and proton synchrotrons, electron and ion sources for accelerators, targets.
Outline:1. Nuclear power, types of reactors used in NPP
2. Basic principle of nuclear reactors, chain reaction
3. Neutron balance of reactor
4. Reactivity balance, fuel cycle
5. Spent fuel
6. Monitoring in NPP, environmental impact assessment of NPP
7. Future of Nuclear Energy, Nuclear Fusion
8. Type of accelerators,
9. Particle dynamics
10. Linear accelerator
11. Cyclotron, betatron, microtron
12. Electron and proton synchrotron
13. Electron a ion sources, targets
14. Application of Accelerators
Outline (exercises):
Goals:Knowledge:
Obtaining the knowledges about the fundamentals and types of nuclear reactors and accelerators and related problems of radiation protection.

Abilities:
Gaining knowledge about the principles and types of nuclear reactors and accelerators, with their use and the principles of radiation protection associated with their operation.
Requirements:Knowledge of Basic nuclear physics, dosimery an detection of ionizing radiation.
Key words:Nuclear power, chain reaction, nuclear reactor, spent fuel, linear accelerator, circular accelerator
ReferencesKey references:
[1] L. Sklenka: Provozní reaktorová technika, ČVUT 2001
[2] S. Humphries: Principles of Charge Particle Acceleration, John Wiley and Sons 1999
[3] H. Wiedemann: Particle Accelerator Physics, Springer Verlag Berlin 1999

Recommended references:
[4] F. Click, J. Daliba, Nuclear Energy, Technical University 2002

Teaching aids:
Carny, P., The EU Este, User Guide, Trnava 2008

Winter School of Plasma Physics and Fusion Physics 102ZLSTF12 Svoboda 1 týden z 1 týden z 1 1
Course:Winter School of Plasma Physics and Fusion Physics 102ZLSTF1Ing. Svoboda Vojtěch CSc.1týd. Z-1-
Abstract:Regular international "Student Winter School of Plasma and Fusion Physics" should help students to improve their communication skills. Each participating student presents a talk on his research.
Outline:Regular international "Student Winter School of Plasma and Fusion Physics" should help
students to improve their communication skills. Each
participating student presents a talk on his research.
Outline (exercises):Regular international "Student Winter School of Plasma and Fusion Physics" should help
students to improve their communication skills. Each
participating student presents a talk on his research.
Goals:Knowledge:
regular "Student Winter School of Plasma and Fusion Physics" should help students to improve their communication skills. Each participating student presents a talk on his research.

Skills:
improving of students communication skills
Requirements:Knowledge of basic course of physics
02TEF1,2 Theoretical physics 1,2
Key words:
ReferencesReferences are done according to the subject.

Course:Summer School of Plasma Physics and Fusion Physics 202ZLSTF2Ing. Svoboda Vojtěch CSc.-1týd. Z-1
Abstract:Regular international "Student Summer School of Plasma and Fusion Physics" should help students to improve their communication skills. Each participating student presents a talk on his research.
Outline:Regular international "Student Summer (Winter) School of Plasma and Fusion Physics" should help
students to improve their communication skills. Each
participating student presents a talk on his research.
Outline (exercises):Regular international "Student Summer (Winter) School of Plasma and Fusion Physics" should help
students to improve their communication skills. Each
participating student presents a talk on his research.
Goals:Knowledge:
regular "Student Summer School of Plasma and Fusion Physics" should help students to improve their communication

Skills:
improving of students communication skills
Requirements:
Key words:
ReferencesReferences are done according to the subject.